Quantcast

Report Finds Keystone XL Would Be Even Worse Than Predicted

The final decision on the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline is indefinitely on hold, but damning evidence of the pipeline’s potential harm continues to grow.

The Big Picture With Thom Hartmann looks at a new report by the Stockholm Environmental Institute finding that, if approved, Keystone XL could be even worse for the environment than we already thought.

If built, the pipeline could add up to a whopping four times more carbon pollution to our atmosphere than originally estimated by the State Department.

How could the State Department so drastically underestimate the potential climate change-causing pollution? Simple: the analysis did not consider global impacts of the Keystone XL.

How important are these findings? Tyson Slocum, director of Public Citizen’s energy program, joins Hartmann to discuss oil prices, tar sands, climate—and the big question on opponents' minds: Could this be the final nail in the coffin for the Keystone XL pipeline?

You Might Also Like

As Keystone XL Dominoes Fall, Time to Arrest Tar Sands Industry

Cumulative Climate Impacts of Tar Sands Pipelines

Higher Cancer Rates and Tainted Local Foods Linked to Tar Sands Operations

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Truth in Action is a day-long global conversation on the climate crisis and how we solve it. The Climate Reality Project

Former Vice President Al Gore kicked off 24 hours of climate talks in the U.S. and 77 other countries around the world Wednesday night.

Read More Show Less
Activists highlighted the climate emergency outside Scottish Government headquarters at St Andrew's House in Edinburgh on Oct. 13, 2017. Usage of the term "climate emergency" spiked in 2019, according to Oxford Dictionaries.

By Jessica Corbett

Climate advocates and experts celebrated Oxford Dictionaries' announcement Wednesday that "climate emergency" is the Oxford Word of the Year 2019.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Using more bamboo for building could slow climate change. kazuend / Unsplash

By Kieran Cooke

There could be a way of countering one key aspect of the climate emergency by making much greater use of a widely-available plant: bamboo building.

Read More Show Less
Fossil fueled power plant pictured before a rain. glasseyes view / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Governments are producing fossil fuels at a rate 120 percent above compliance with Paris agreement goals, a landmark report from the UN Environment Programme found.

Read More Show Less
Ten Democratic primary candidates participated in the fifth Democratic debate in Atlanta Wednesday night. Alex Wong / Getty Images

The moderators of the fifth Democratic primary debate in Atlanta Wednesday night only asked one question about the climate crisis, Grist reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less