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WATCH: Inspiring & Easy Way to Make a Huge Difference #LandfillChallenge

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We are excited to announce that today marks the start of our 21-day #LandfillChallenge in which we're challenging you to hold on to your plastic trash for 21 days.

The average American produces 4.4 pounds of waste per day. Since our garbage is "out of sight, out of mind," it's easy for us to disregard how much we are contributing to our growing landfills. We will no longer sit back and watch this destruction build—instead we'll offer solutions and encourage you to participate through various challenges throughout 2019. Let's do this!


Let's Make 2019 the Year of Plastic Pollution Solutions

Last year generated critically important momentum for plastic pollution awareness. Considering how the topic is now being talked about on mainstream media, how Collins Dictionary designated "single-use" as the word of the year and how the theme of Earth Day was ending plastic pollution, it's near impossible to have a blind eye to the problem. To take action you have to start by seeing exactly what the problem is and that's why we're thrilled to invite you on this journey that we've called the #landfillchallenge.

Once we see how much garbage we produce in the next 21 days, we'll see the immediacy of the need to act. Reducing waste is such an easy way to make a small act for a massive ripple effect on our planet.

Your Chance to Make a Huge Impact

We've teamed up with Blue Yourself to create a simple process for you. Save your plastic trash for 21 days, then join us on Jan. 26 to share our experience together.

  1. While continuing your normal daily routine, hold on to all plastic trash for 21 days—including recyclables and trash you create while on the go.
  2. Create social media posts on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter using the hashtag #LandfillChallenge.
  3. Have the chance to get featured on the Instagram stories of EcoWatch and our co-host Blue Yourself by tagging @EcoWatch and @Blue_Yourself as you document your experience.
  4. Join us Saturday Jan. 26 at 10 a.m. EST / 7 a.m. PST as we hold a Facebook Live on EcoWatch to mark the start of a week of reflection together.
  5. Co-create with us on Jan. 26 if you are feeling the pull. Show us your positive energy and enthusiasm in your social media posts and we may reach out to you and invite you to our live video talk show during our live reflection event.

Week-Long Reflection Will Help Us Plan Next Step

A week-long reflection will teach us the following information we need to know to make changes in our lives:

  • Are we in fact "aspirational recyclers?"
  • Do the numbers on the bottom of recyclables mean anything?
  • Which of the three "r's" of reduce, reuse, recycle is most important?
  • Are all of our recyclables actually recycled?
  • What's the best way to recycle plastic bottles?
  • What do we do with compostable plastic?

You've Been Challenged! Tell Your Friends. We're All in This Together.

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