Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Noble Causes Everyone Should Support

Insights + Opinion

Stefanie Penn Spear

This Thanksgiving, the grassroots environmental movement had many reasons to be thankful. November brought many victories including the delays on the Keystone XL pipeline and fracking the Delaware River Basin. But perhaps what’s most exciting to celebrate is the growing collaboration and current momentum of the environmental movement.

I’ve been working at the grassroots level for more than two decades, and have never seen this degree of unity among people and organizations protecting the Earth. From the leadership of Bill McKibben whose gift to mobilize people is unmatched, to Josh Fox’s unwavering dedication to stop fracking, to Annie Leonard’s ability to simplify complex issues through The Story of Stuff Project, to the leadership of executive directors like Greenpeace’s Phil Radford and Sierra Club’s Michael Brune, to the tireless work of Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., it’s clear that the modern-day environmental movement is at an all-time high with the ability to create lasting change.

Of course there’s plenty of work to be done, including strengthening historic environmental laws like the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act, passing new legislation like a federal energy bill, getting money out of politics through campaign finance reform, and educating people on ways they can protect human health and the environment.

Hopefully our political leaders will take heed of Australia’s recent passage of its landmark clean energy bill that will cap emissions and spur investment in renewable energy, and the International Energy Agency’s warning that we need to stop relying on insecure and environmentally unsustainable uses of energy, and adopt bold policies to prevent a world-wide energy crisis.

At EcoWatch, we are at the forefront of these issues by promoting the work of the grassroots environmental movement through this publication and our news service website EcoWatch.org. Visit this site to stay informed on the most important environmental news of the day and help us spread the word to gain even more momentum for this movement.

We all know that collaboration will be the key to our success in providing clean water, fresh air, healthy food and sustainable energy to future generations—noble causes everyone should support.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

An aerial view of a crude oil storage facility of Caspian Pipeline Consortium (CPC) in the Krasnodar Territory. Vitaly Timkiv / TASS / Getty Images

Oil rigs around the world keep pulling crude oil out of the ground, but the global pandemic has sent shockwaves into the market. The supply is up, but demand has plummeted now that industry has ground to a halt, highways are empty, and airplanes are parked in hangars.

Read More Show Less
Examples (from left) of a lead pipe, a corroded steel pipe and a lead pipe treated with protective orthophosphate. U.S. EPA Region 5

Under an agreement negotiated by community groups — represented by NRDC and the Pennsylvania Utility Law Project — the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA) will remove thousands of lead water pipes by 2026 in order to address the chronically high lead levels in the city's drinking water and protect residents' health.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
ROBYN BECK / AFP / Getty Images

By Dave Cooke

So, they finally went and did it — the Trump administration just finalized a rule to undo requirements on manufacturers to improve fuel economy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from new passenger cars and trucks. Even with the economy at the brink of a recession, they went forward with a policy they know is bad for consumers — their own analysis shows that American drivers are going to spend hundreds of dollars more in fuel as a result of this stupid policy — but they went ahead and did it anyway.

Read More Show Less

By Richard Connor

A blood test that screens for more than 50 types of cancer could help doctors treat patients at an earlier stage than previously possible, a new study shows. The method was used to screen for more than 50 types of cancer — including particularly deadly variants such as pancreatic, ovarian, bowel and brain.

Read More Show Less
Ian Sane / Flickr

Preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control showed a larger number of young people coming down with COVID-19 than first expected, with patients under the age of 45 comprising more than a third of all cases, and one in five of those patients requiring hospitalization. That also tends to be the group most likely to use e-cigarettes.

Read More Show Less