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Naomi Klein: Debating Whether Keystone XL Has Climate Impact Is Absurd

Climate

Today on Democracy Now! journalist and best-selling author Naomi Klein joined Amy Goodman and Juan González to discuss the expected Senate vote this week to approve a pro-Keystone XL bill backed by Louisiana Democratic Sen. Mary Landrieu.

Last week, House lawmakers passed similar legislation to approve the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline that will bring this carbon-intensive oil from Alberta, Canada, to the Texas Gulf Coast. On Friday, President Obama strongly suggested that the legislation, if passed by the Senate, won’t get past his desk.

Watch as Klein shares with Goodman her thoughts on the pending vote, "The idea that it's still up for some kind of debate whether or not building Keystone XL has a climate impact is absurd. Keystone is a pipeline that is intimately linked to plans by the oil and gas industry to dramatically expand production in the Alberta tar sands. They have pipeline capacity more or less to get the oil out that they are producing right now, but they have active plans to double and triple production in the Alberta tar sands digging up one of the highest carbon fuels on the planet with tremendous local health impacts to first nations people to indigenous people living in that region, violating their treaty rights."

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