Quantcast

Millennials Demand Climate Action

Energy

As our government fails to act on climate change, millions of young Americans—yes, the millennials—are refusing to let their futures be put on the chopping block of corporate greed. We are coming together as a powerful grassroots force.

This isn’t just about stopping fossil fuel development. It’s about breaking the system of influence that has allowed the fossil fuel industry to gain the power to destroy our planet without recourse.

In this short film, this new generation shows that we're not defined by our digital existence. We know that strong communities are going to be a critical part of the solution. Despite being the generation of social media, click-tivism, and online relationships, millennials know in their guts that it’s going to take a collective effort to win the fight on climate change. And they believe grassroots organizing can be that effort.

That’s what we’re looking to do with The Solutions Grassroots Tour.

We’re currently running an Indiegogo campaign to raise the funds to bring the Solutions Grassroots Tour to impacted communities across America, so that those on the chopping blocks of fossil fuel development and climate change can begin to lead the transition to 100 percent renewable energy.

We know it's the same all over—everyone is on the front lines of this battle—young people in the Bronx suffering from asthma are feeling the impacts of fossil fuel development just like people in fracked rural areas of Pennsylvania and the suburbs of Texas. The limitless greed of big oil and gas has united Americans like never before.

I’m one of those millennials that was deeply impacted and inspired by Obama’s presidential campaigns. I voted proudly for the first time in 2008 and worked as a field organizer for his 2012 campaign in Western Pennsylvania.

We are the people who the Obama campaign inspired to believe in the power of grassroots organizing. We heard President Obama say neighbor talking to neighbor is worth more than any amount of corporate spending and we knew it was true in the core of our being.

However, we didn’t feel that way last Tuesday on election night.

If politicians—especially Democrats—want to create the enthusiasm that inspired a grassroots nation to elect Barack Obama, they’re going to have to stand for inspiring positions because there’s no compromise when it comes to climate change and millennials' future. And there’s no compromise when a fracking rig threatens your livelihood.

No more weak positions. We can build a new America for our generation, but it has to be together.

This election, there were some bright spots—a ban on fracking in fracking's birthplace—Denton, Texas. And in New York, Fractivists turned out strong for Zephyr Teachout because she took strong, sensible, inspiring positions—ban fracking day one and get money out of politics.

The 2014 election showed us that we cannot wait for the government to act. If we want to build the solutions that will save us from the devastating impacts of climate change we’re going to have to start building them ourselves.

Communities need to come together to build renewable energy and put the power back in the hands of the people.

Please help us support democracy, culture and the solutions by supporting The Solutions Grassroots Tour.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Denton, Texas Fracking Ban Under Attack by Bush Family Inner Circle

100+ Arrested at Beyond Extreme Energy’s Week-Long Protests at FERC

Millennials ask “Why? Why Not?” at UN Climate Summit

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A Starbucks barista prepares a drink at a Starbucks Coffee Shop location in New York. Ramin Talaie / Corbis via Getty Images

By Cathy Cassata

Are you getting your fill of Starbucks' new Almondmilk Honey Flat White, Oatmilk Honey Latte, and Coconutmilk Latte, but wondering just how healthy they are?

Read More
Radiation warning sign at the Union Carbide uranium mill in Rifle, Colorado, in 1972. Credit: National Archives / Environmental Protection Agency, public domain

By Sharon Kelly

Back in April last year, the Trump administration's Environmental Protection Agency decided it was "not necessary" to update the rules for toxic waste from oil and gas wells. Torrents of wastewater flow daily from the nation's 1.5 million active oil and gas wells and the agency's own research has warned it may pose risks to the country's drinking water supplies.

Read More
Sponsored
Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg takes part in a "Friday for Future" youth demonstration in a street of Davos on Jan. 24, 2020 on the sideline of the World Economic Forum annual meeting. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP via Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin pretended not to know who Greta Thunberg is, and then he told her to get a degree in economics before giving world leaders advice, as The Guardian reported.

Read More
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite on the Suomi NPP satellite acquired this image of forest fire smoke hovering over North America on Aug. 15, 2018. NASA Earth Observatory

New York City isn't known for having the cleanest air, but researchers traced recent air pollution spikes there to two surprising sources — fires hundreds of miles away in Canada and the southeastern U.S.

Read More
If temperatures continue to rise, the world is at risk from global sea-level rise, which will flood many coastal cities as seen above in Bangladesh. NurPhoto / Contributor / Getty Images

The mounting climate emergency may spur the next global financial crisis and the world's central banks are woefully ill equipped to handle the consequences, according to a new book-length report by the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), as S&P Global reported. Located in Basel, Switzerland, the BIS is an umbrella organization for the world's central banks.

Read More