Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Keystone XL Opponents Rally in All 50 States

Energy
Keystone XL Opponents Rally in All 50 States

Thousands of people rallied yesterday in all 50 states urging President Obama to reject the Keystone XL pipeline. At 158 events from Maine to Los Angeles, with many weathering frigid temperatures in the single digits, people chanted, sang songs, and held signs and banners calling on President Obama to veto the Keystone XL bill if and when the bill passes the Senate.

Students from Middlebury College say no to the Keystone XL pipeline.

From high school students rallying in Mission, South Dakota on the Rosebud Sioux Indian reservation, where tribal leaders recently called the Keystone XL "an act of war" to Nebraska where Omaha Pipeline Fighters rallied outside the offices of U.S. Rep Brad Ashford (D-NE) to condemn his vote for pro-Keystone legislation in Congress to Seattle, Washington where hundreds encircled the Henry Jackson Federal Building to Milwaukee, Wisconsin where activists spelled out, "Reject KXL Now" in lights on a highway overpass to Washington, DC where a groups delivered 500,000 signatures calling on President Obama to veto the Keystone XL, last night's events showed solidarity among people across America that know the Keystone XL pipeline is the wrong direction for our country, our climate and our future.

"There's a healthy and growing movement of people in this country who want to see dirty fuels like tar sands stay in the ground and move rapidly to clean energy," said Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club. "The events taking place today across the nation let President Obama know that the people have his back. If the president denies the Keystone XL pipeline it attests to the fact that nobody voted for dirty air, polluted water and climate denial."

Yesterday was also a big day in the Senate when Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont introduced an amendment that would officially put Congress on record with their position on climate change.

Twenty five people in Norwich, Vermont stood out in the cold yesterday morning, including high school students, members of the Dartmouth College ski team, working people and grandparents.

“History will judge President Obama harshly if he fails to reject Keystone XL,” said Rainforest Action Network climate program director Amanda Starbuck. “If the president is serious about his legacy on climate change, a clear ‘no’ on this destructive project is the only course of action. The science is clear: to avoid a climate catastrophe, we have to leave nearly all Canadian tar sands oil in the ground. It’s time for the president to reject the pipeline.”

Opponents of the pipeline are banking on President Obama's clear indication that he will veto the Keystone XL pipeline bill.

“We’re here today to send one message loud and clear to this White House: the time for rejection is now,” said Jason Kowalski, policy director for 350.org. “A lot’s changed since we began this campaign, but the facts haven’t—Keystone XL puts American land, air and water at risk while releasing tons of new carbon into the atmosphere to hasten the worst impacts of climate change. It’s bad public policy, but President Obama’s in a better position than ever before to put this issue to bed, and reject this pipeline once and for all."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Tell President Obama: Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Senator Bernie Sanders Asks: Does Congress Believe Climate Change Is Real

Robert Redford: Why Keystone XL Is the Wrong Choice for America

Colette Pichon Battle, attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy. Colette Pichon Battle

By Karen L. Smith-Janssen

Colette Pichon Battle gave a December 2019 TEDWomen Talk on the stark realities of climate change displacement, and people took notice. The video racked up a million views in about two weeks. The attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy (GCCLP) advocates for climate justice in communities of color. Confronted with evidence showing how her own South Louisiana coastal home of Bayou Liberty will be lost to flooding in coming years, the 2019 Obama Fellow dedicates herself to helping others still reeling from the impacts of Katrina face the heavy toll that climate change has taken—and will take—on their lives and homelands. Her work focuses on strengthening multiracial coalitions, advocating for federal, state, and local disaster mitigation measures, and redirecting resources toward Black communities across the Gulf South.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A palm tree plantation in Malaysia. Yann Arthus-Bertrand / Getty Images Plus

Between 2000 and 2013, Earth lost an area of undisturbed ecosystems roughly the size of Mexico.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A home burns during the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, California on September 18, 2020. Kyle Grillot / AFP/ Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

"These are not just wildfires, they are climate fires," Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington State, said as he stood amid the charred remains of the town of Malden west of Seattle earlier this month. "This is not an act of God," he added. "This has happened because we have changed the climate of the state of Washington in dramatic ways."

Read More Show Less
A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world. PickPik

A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world, The Guardian reported. The study examined 25 years of carbon dioxide emissions and wealth inequality from 1990 to 2015.

Read More Show Less
The label of one of the recalled thyroid medications. FDA

If you are taking medication for an underactive thyroid, check your prescription.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch