Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Keri Russell: We Need to Protect the Arctic for Future Generations

Climate
Keri Russell: We Need to Protect the Arctic for Future Generations

The Arctic has been in the news a lot lately since President Obama gave conditional approval to Shell to start drilling for oil and gas in the northernmost part of the Earth. Shell could begin exploratory drilling as early as next week, risking devastating oil spills and ensuring more carbon emissions pumped into the atmosphere, undermining the goals set by the U.S. in its fight against climate change.

Golden Globe-winner Keri Russell and Oscar-nominated director Darren Aronofsky hike in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: Sierra Club / Fitz Cahall

To bring greater awareness to these dire concerns, Golden Globe-winner Keri Russell, Oscar-nominated director Darren Aronofsky, Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune along with veterans advocates Genevieve Chase and BriGette McCoy, and author Rebecca Solnit just visited the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. They saw firsthand why millions of Americans want the Arctic permanently protected.

“Going to Alaska was a lifelong dream,” said Russell. “I’m amazed by the incredible beauty and serenity of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Having the chance to camp and raft the Kongakut River and completely immerse myself in nature was a life changing experience and an important reminder that we need to protect these lands for future generations.”

Golden Globe-winner Keri Russell in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: Sierra Club / Fitz Cahall

They witnessed some of the Arctic Refuge's incredible wildlife such as grizzly bears, Dall sheep, Arctic foxes, peregrine falcons and bald eagles.

“This expedition was a reminder of when I had the opportunity to visit the Prince William Sound in Southcentral Alaska as a teenager, and what a life-changing event that was," said Aronofsky. "Shortly after that trip, however, the Sound was devastated by the Exxon Valdez oil spill. We cannot allow a similar fate befall the Arctic. The Arctic Refuge and Ocean must be permanently protected from the threat of oil and gas companies.”

Oscar-nominated director Darren Aronofsky in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Photo credit: Sierra Club / Fitz Cahall

“Despite the awesome beauty we were fortunate enough to witness during this trip, there were constant reminders of the devastating effects of climate change,” said Brune. “From melting glaciers to unseasonably warm weather—to say nothing of the looming threat Shell poses if it is allowed to drill in the Arctic—this trip was a clear reminder that we must pass legislation to curb the effects of climate change.”

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore shares Brune's concerns and criticized President Obama last week for allowing fossil fuel drilling in the Arctic, calling the recently approved Shell project “insane.” And, on Saturday, people in 13 states gathered for a ShellNo” Day of Action asking President Obama to revoke oil and gas exploration leases in the Chukchi Sea.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

10 Awesome Tweets From #ShellNo to Arctic Drilling Day of Action

7 Climate Records Broken in 2014 Indicates Earth Is ‘Gravely Ill’

Al Gore: Obama’s Plan for Arctic Drilling Is ‘Insane’

Yves Adams / Instagram

A rare yellow penguin has been photographed for what is believed to be the first time.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Crystal building in London, England is the first building in the world to be awarded an outstanding BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) rating and a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum rating. Alphotographic / Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

We spend 90% of our time in the buildings where we live and work, shop and conduct business, in the structures that keep us warm in winter and cool in summer.

But immense energy is required to source and manufacture building materials, to power construction sites, to maintain and renew the built environment. In 2019, building operations and construction activities together accounted for 38% of global energy-related CO2 emissions, the highest level ever recorded.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Houses and wooden debris are shown in flood waters from Hurricane Katrina Sept. 11, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Jerry Grayson / Helifilms Australia PTY Ltd / Getty Images

By Eric Tate and Christopher Emrich

Disasters stemming from hazards like floods, wildfires, and disease often garner attention because of their extreme conditions and heavy societal impacts. Although the nature of the damage may vary, major disasters are alike in that socially vulnerable populations often experience the worst repercussions. For example, we saw this following Hurricanes Katrina and Harvey, each of which generated widespread physical damage and outsized impacts to low-income and minority survivors.

Read More Show Less
A gray wolf is seen howling outside in winter. Wolfgang Kaehler / Contributor / Getty Images

Wisconsin will end its controversial wolf hunt early after hunters and trappers killed almost 70 percent of the state's quota in the hunt's first 48 hours.

Read More Show Less
Tom Vilsack speaks on December 11, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware after being nominated to be Agriculture Secretary by U.S. President Joe Biden. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Sen. Bernie Sanders on Tuesday was the lone progressive to vote against Tom Vilsack reprising his role as secretary of agriculture, citing concerns that progressive advocacy groups have been raising since even before President Joe Biden officially nominated the former Obama administration appointee.

Read More Show Less