Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

How Jane Fonda, in Her 80s, Has Turned to Climate Activism

Climate
How Jane Fonda, in Her 80s, Has Turned to Climate Activism
Actress Jane Fonda is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on Oct. 25, 2019 in Washington, DC. John Lamparski / Getty Images

When you see an actor in handcuffs, they're usually filming a movie. But when Jane Fonda, Ted Danson, Sally Field, and other celebrities were arrested in Washington, D.C., last fall, the only cameras rolling were from the news media.


"When you're famous, there's a real responsibility to use that celebrity in the best possible way you can," Jane Fonda says.

She began leading weekly demonstrations called Fire Drill Fridays at the U.S. Capitol last October. The goal was to raise awareness about the climate crisis and demand that the country transition away from fossil fuels.

Over the fall, Fonda and other protesters were arrested multiple times for civil disobedience. She even spent a night behind bars.

Fonda says before she started Fire Drill Fridays, she felt depressed and helpless about global warming.

"I wasn't doing enough and I didn't know what to do," she says.

But inspired by Greta Thunberg and other young activists, Fonda decided it was time to join the climate movement.

She says now, instead of just sitting around feeling scared about the future, she feels empowered and even hopeful.

"We have the future in our hands," she says. "What an awesome responsibility and what a beautiful opportunity."

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

Google Earth's latest feature allows you to watch the climate change in four dimensions.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Researchers say there's a growing epidemic of tap water distrust and disuse in the U.S. Teresa Short / Moment Open / Getty Images

By Asher Rosinger

Imagine seeing a news report about lead contamination in drinking water in a community that looks like yours. It might make you think twice about whether to drink your tap water or serve it to your kids – especially if you also have experienced tap water problems in the past.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A new report urges immediate climate action to control global warming. John W Banagan / Getty Images

A new report promoting urgent climate action in Australia has stirred debate for claiming that global temperatures will rise past 1.5 degrees Celsius in the next decade.

Read More Show Less
Winegrowers check vines during the burning of anti-frost candles in the Luneau-Papin wine vineyard in Le Landreau, near Nantes, western France, on April 12, 2021. SEBASTIEN SALOM-GOMIS / AFP via Getty Images

French winemakers are facing devastating grape loss from the worst frost in decades, preceded by unusually warm temperatures, highlighting the dangers to the sector posed by climate change.

Read More Show Less
A recent study focused on regions in Ethiopia, Africa's largest coffee-producing nation. Edwin Remsberg / Getty Images

Climate change could make it harder to find a good cup of coffee, new research finds. A changing climate might shrink suitable areas for specialty coffee production without adaptation, making coffee taste blander and impacting the livelihoods of small farms in the Global South.

Read More Show Less