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Joaquin Phoenix, Martin Sheen Arrested at Jane Fonda's Final DC Fire Drill Fridays Protest

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Joaquin Phoenix is seen on the center steps of the Capitol before being arrested during a weekly rally with Jane Fonda to call for action on climate change on Friday, January 10, 2020. Tom Williams / CQ-Roll Call, Inc / Getty Images

By Zach Roberts

Every Friday for the last seven weeks, actress and activist Jane Fonda has held a rally and act of civil disobedience in front of the U.S. Capitol, calling for action on climate change. Each week she's been joined by different celebrities, journalists, and activists. Previous weeks have seen actors such as Law & Order's Sam Waterston, Fonda's co-star in Grace and Frankie, Lily Tomin, and Lincoln's Sally Field, to name a few.


This final week in Washington, DC did not see Fonda get arrested like five of the previous weeks. In her stead, West Wing's Martin Sheen and Joker's Joaquin Phoenix were arrested and ticketed in an act of civil disobedience alongside hundreds of other activists.

Fonda is moving her protest to Los Angeles starting Feb. 7 and every Friday after that. She announced that #FireDrillFridays will be spreading across the country and those behind the movement will be creating activist kits for people to start their own localized actions.

Also at this week's protest were progressive author Naomi Klein, activist Eriel Tchekwie Deranger, Tribal attorney Tara Houska, Cherokee businessperson Rebecca Adamson, and Greenpeace executive director Annie Leonard.

View the slideshow:

Jane Fonda is joined with actor Susan Sarandon as they march from their rally to the steps of the U.S. Capitol with hundreds of fellow activists behind them.

Reposted with permission from the DeSmogBlog.

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