Quantcast

Interactive Map: 50,000 Wind Turbines Generate One-Third of America's Green Energy

Business

Drive down just about any highway in the Midwest or Plains states and you’ll see seemingly endless fields of corn, beans and wheat. But in recent decades, a crop of a different sort has been sprouting up: wind turbines. Wind now generates a third of U.S. renewable electricity and the industry is growing faster than any other clean power source in the country. And with this new interactive mapthe U.S. Geological Survey tells us exactly where our wind farms are and what technologies they sport.

This new interactive map tells us exactly where our wind farms are and what technologies they sport. Photo credit: U.S. Geological Survey

With about 50,000 turbines already standing within our borders, the U.S., along with 18 other countries, pledged to double its investment in renewable power by 2020. So, we may be seeing even more red dots on this map (and blades spinning along the roadside) soon. 

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

25 American Companies Go Big With Solar

Brad Pitt’s Nonprofit Delivers LEED Platinum Homes to Fort Peck Reservation

100% Renewable-Powered World ‘Technically Feasible and Economically Viable’ by 2030

782 Richest People Could Power Half the World With 100% Renewable Energy

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Yulia Lisitsa / iStock / Getty Images

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many people follow the lacto-vegetarian diet for its flexibility and health benefits.

Read More Show Less

By Jared Kaufman

Eating a better diet has been linked with lower levels of heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. But unfortunately 821 million people — about 1 in 9 worldwide — face hunger, and roughly 2 billion people worldwide are overweight or obese, according to the U.N. World Health Organization. In addition, food insecurity is associated with even higher health care costs in the U.S., particularly among older people. To help direct worldwide focus toward solving these issues, the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals call for the elimination of hunger, food insecurity and undernutrition by 2030.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Healthline

Made from the freshly sprouted leaves of Triticum aestivum, wheatgrass is known for its nutrient-dense and powerful antioxidant properties.

Read More Show Less

mevans / E+ / Getty Images

The federal agency that manages the Great Barrier Reef issued an unprecedented statement that broke ranks with Australia's conservative government and called for urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Guardian.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

A powerful earthquake struck near Athens, Greece and shook the capital city for 15 seconds on Friday, causing people to run into the streets to escape the threat of falling buildings, NBC News reported.

Read More Show Less
U.S. government scientists concluded in a new report that last month was the hottest June on record. Angelo Juan Ramos / Flickr

By Jessica Corbett

As meteorologists warned Thursday that temperatures above 100°F are expected to impact two-thirds of the country this weekend, U.S. government scientists revealed that last month was the hottest June ever recorded — bolstering calls for radical global action on the climate emergency.

Read More Show Less
Rod Waddington / CC BY-SA 2.0

By John R. Platt

For years now conservationists have warned that many of Madagascar's iconic lemur species face the risk of extinction due to rampant deforestation, the illegal pet trade and the emerging market for the primates' meat.

Yes, people eat lemurs, and the reasons they do aren't exactly what we might expect.

Read More Show Less