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These Stunning Photos Expose the World's Biggest Crimes Against Nature

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These Stunning Photos Expose the World's Biggest Crimes Against Nature

Human's impact on planet Earth is huge. Thanks to the work of environmentalist and photographer, J Henry Fair, we can now get a bird's-eye view of the world's ever-increasing demand for energy, eating habits and rampant consumerism that are degrading our planet.


Fair's new book, Industrial Scars, The Hidden Costs of Consumption, shows the effects industrial production has on our environment and exposes the dirty "secrets from oil drilling, fracking and coal-ash waste, to large scale agricultural production and abandoned mining operations."

Fair's book has received rave reviews from many, including Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org. "Think of these images as a surveillance camera for the planet, recording the biggest crimes against nature we've ever imagined," McKibben said. "Images like these will be the standards around which we muster."

The New York Times' Roberta Smith said, "The vivid color photographs of J Henry Fair lead an uneasy double life as potent records of environmental pollution and as ersatz evocations of abstract painting ... information and form work together, to devastating effect."

In the book, Fair's images are accompanied by detailed explanations from award-winning science writer, Lewis Smith.

"The overall message is clear," according to Fair. "It is up to us to accept a consumer responsibility and environmental awareness and to change our habits if we want to ensure a better world for future generations to enjoy."

For more information, visit Fair's Facebook page.

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