Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Indigenous Peoples’ Protest in Brazil Met With Police Brutality

Popular
Mídia Ninja / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

By Dawn Bickett

A group of farmers viciously attacked a nearby Indigenous community in Brazil on Sunday. Thirteen Indigenous People were wounded. Two men had limbs hacked off with a machete.


This kind of violence may seem unthinkable, but it is becoming the rule in the Brazilian Amazon. Each year, dozens of Indigenous People are injured or killed in conflicts with farmers and ranchers over land.

Last week, about 3,000 Indigenous Peoples carried hundreds of black coffins to the National Congress in the capital of Brazil, Brasília, to protest the rising violence and to demand rights to their ancestral lands.

Sônia Guajajara, an Indigenous leader and one of the coordinators of the march, explained: "We carried 200 coffins symbolizing the genocide and deaths of Indigenous Peoples at the hands of the authorities allied to agribusiness."

Rogério Assis / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

The protest was peaceful, but police met the crowd with rubber bullets and gas bombs.

Rogério Assis / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

The Brazilian government is enabling and perpetuating violence against Indigenous Peoples, and it doesn't stop with police brutality.

Mídia Ninja / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

In rural areas, local authorities take little action—sometimes none—to apprehend land-grabbers who often start conflicts. Meanwhile, the aggressive agribusiness lobby in Brazil's Congress is working to weaken or end the process giving Indigenous communities control of their lands.

Mídia Ninja / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

The state's attacks against peaceful protestors are unconscionable and unacceptable, and the wave of violence in rural areas of Brazil is a suppression of fundamental human rights.

Indigenous Peoples are fighting for their rights and their land in Brazil and all around the world—and they continue to be met with violence. It is up to all of us to demand justice and stand in solidarity with Indigenous Peoples.

Start now. Take action and add your name to stand with the Munduruku People of the Brazilian Amazon in their fight to protect their traditional lands.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less

In many parts of the U.S., family farms are disappearing and being replaced by suburban sprawl.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

Read More Show Less
The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less