Quantcast

Indigenous Peoples’ Protest in Brazil Met With Police Brutality

Popular
Mídia Ninja / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

By Dawn Bickett

A group of farmers viciously attacked a nearby Indigenous community in Brazil on Sunday. Thirteen Indigenous People were wounded. Two men had limbs hacked off with a machete.


This kind of violence may seem unthinkable, but it is becoming the rule in the Brazilian Amazon. Each year, dozens of Indigenous People are injured or killed in conflicts with farmers and ranchers over land.

Last week, about 3,000 Indigenous Peoples carried hundreds of black coffins to the National Congress in the capital of Brazil, Brasília, to protest the rising violence and to demand rights to their ancestral lands.

Sônia Guajajara, an Indigenous leader and one of the coordinators of the march, explained: "We carried 200 coffins symbolizing the genocide and deaths of Indigenous Peoples at the hands of the authorities allied to agribusiness."

Rogério Assis / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

The protest was peaceful, but police met the crowd with rubber bullets and gas bombs.

Rogério Assis / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

The Brazilian government is enabling and perpetuating violence against Indigenous Peoples, and it doesn't stop with police brutality.

Mídia Ninja / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

In rural areas, local authorities take little action—sometimes none—to apprehend land-grabbers who often start conflicts. Meanwhile, the aggressive agribusiness lobby in Brazil's Congress is working to weaken or end the process giving Indigenous communities control of their lands.

Mídia Ninja / Mobilização Nacional Indígena

The state's attacks against peaceful protestors are unconscionable and unacceptable, and the wave of violence in rural areas of Brazil is a suppression of fundamental human rights.

Indigenous Peoples are fighting for their rights and their land in Brazil and all around the world—and they continue to be met with violence. It is up to all of us to demand justice and stand in solidarity with Indigenous Peoples.

Start now. Take action and add your name to stand with the Munduruku People of the Brazilian Amazon in their fight to protect their traditional lands.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report spotlights a U.N. estimate that at least 275 million people rely on healthy coral reefs. A sea turtle near the Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef is seen above. THE OCEAN AGENCY / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY

By Jessica Corbett

In a new report about how the world's coral reefs face "the combined threats of climate change, pollution, and overfishing" — endangering the future of marine biodiversity — a London-based nonprofit calls for greater global efforts to end the climate crisis and ensure the survival of these vital underwater ecosystems.

Read More
Half of the extracted resources used were sand, clay, gravel and cement, seen above, for building, along with the other minerals that produce fertilizer. Cavan Images / Cavan / Getty Images

The world is using up more and more resources and global recycling is falling. That's the grim takeaway from a new report by the Circle Economy think tank, which found that the world used up more than 110 billion tons, or 100.6 billion metric tons, of natural resources, as Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported.

Read More
Sponsored

By Gero Rueter

Heating with coal, oil and natural gas accounts for around a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. But that's something we can change, says Wolfgang Feist, founder of the Passive House Institute in the western German city of Darmstadt.

Read More
Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016. Markus Spiske / Unsplash

By George Citroner

  • Recent research finds that official government figures may be underestimating drug deaths by half.
  • Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016.
  • Drug use decreases life expectancy after age 15 by 1.4 years for men and by just under 1 year for women, on average.

Government records may be severely underreporting how many Americans die from drug use, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University.

Read More
Water coolers in front of shut-off water fountains at Center School in Stow, MA on Sept. 4, 2019 after elevated levels of PFAS were found in the water. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In a new nationwide assessment of drinking water systems, the Environmental Working Group found that toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS are far more prevalent than previously thought.

Read More