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Maryland wetlands near Nanticoke Wildlife Management Area. Farmers, developers or landowners will no longer need a permit to pollute the streams and wetlands. NRDC / Matt Rath / Chesapeake Bay Program / Flickr

The Trump administration repealed the 2015 Clean Water Rule rule Thursday, a rule intended to protect 60 percent of the nation's waterways from pollution, The New York Times reported.

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Ben Birchall - PA Images / Contributor / Getty Images

The ocean isn't the only ecosystem threatened by microplastics.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Seaweed farmer in Bali, Indonesia on Nov. 23, 2018. Anton Raharjo / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Alex Robinson

Seaweed. It's the bane of swimmers, and can ruin a nice day at the beach. But harvesting the aquatic plant could play a role in mitigating the effects of climate change.

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emholk / E+ / Getty Images

By Brian Barth

Many root vegetables are considered "cool weather" crops — they grow lush and juicy when daytime temperatures are in the seventies, but barely muddle through hot weather. Which is why we plant them as early in spring as possible. But fall is just as suitable a growing season; this is when, in times past, we would be filling our "root cellars," after all.

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National Institude of Allergy and Infectious Disease

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned Thursday of a drug-resistant strain of salmonella newport linked to the overuse of antibiotics in cattle farming.

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Mason Phillips and Maltby sit amidst an edible flower garden planted in a borrowed backyard in Ottawa, Canada. Madeleine Maltby

By Lindsay Campbell

In 2015, Madeleine Maltby began knocking on neighborhood doors in Canada's capital city, Ottawa, with a simple proposal. In exchange for a backyard, the residents would let her grow a garden full of crops with a percentage they could enjoy.

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One of Michael Kirk's five sheep grazing fields in Vermont at Shelburne Vineyard. Samuel Rheaume

By Lindsay Campbell

They're an unlikely pair, but Vermont friends Ethan Joseph and Michael Kirk have managed to devise a partnership that combines their two separate working worlds.

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Pexels

By Rachael Roth

The year 2019 is the year of the pig, and we speculate that it's also the year of the vegan (how many dating profiles have bragged about animal-free diets recently?). With 55 percent of Americans vowing to eat more plant-forward diets this year, it's clear that our focus has shifted from consuming animals to cuddling with them. Lovers of all things furry can now stay overnight at farms that house and rehabilitate animals across the U.S. When you stay at one of these sanctuaries, you'll be guaranteed quality time with critters and contribute to the longevity of the farms' initiatives, so you can sleep even easier.

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A field of crops grows in Brawley, California. Florence Low / California Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

Despite the warning signs — climate change, biodiversity loss, depleted soils and a shrinking supply of cheap energy — we continue to push along with an economy fueled by perpetual growth on a finite planet.

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gruizza / E+ / Getty Images

The meat- and saturated fat-heavy Paleolithic or "Paleo" diet, inspired by what our cavemen ancestors ate hundreds of thousands of years ago before the advent of farming, has become popular in recent years for its purported weight loss and gut health benefits. But new research suggests that following the diet too strictly may increase risk of heart disease.

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Rawpixel / iStock / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

The movement to institute required agriculture classes in American public schools is small, but strong.

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