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Increase Office Morale and Productivity With Indoor Plant Hire

Numerous studies from all over the world have highlighted the many benefits of having indoor plants in the workplace. From improved air quality and aesthetics, to increased morale and productivity among workers, there are countless benefits to having plants in an office environment. Here we are going to look at those benefits more closely, as well as the benefits of indoor plant hire.

Benefits of having indoor plants in an office 

Improving air quality

Research by Bio-Safe Incorporated found that air in offices can be up to ten times more polluted than the air outside. Air conditioning is used to circulate air, but no fresh air is brought in from outside. Offices can be packed with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as pollutants from plastics, synthetics, furnishings and solvents.

However, research has shown that rooms with plants have 50% to 60% fewer airborne moulds and bacteria than rooms without plants. Plants do this by sucking nasties such as VOCs and carbon dioxide out of the air, drawing them down into their roots and releasing oxygen back into the environment.

Reducing sickness

Research has shown that plants can help to reduce Sick Building Syndrome and can help to increase worker wellbeing. A study in Norway showed that introducing plants to a workplace decreased absenteeism from 15% to 5%.

Increasing productivity

A Washington State University by Dr Virginia Lohr found that students working in a computer lab that contained plants were 12% more efficient than students doing the same tasks in plant-free labs. Research from Texas A&M University found that both men and women were more productive in plant-filled offices, demonstrating more innovative thinking, and coming up with more ideas and original solutions.

Regulating temperature

The recommended humidity range for human health and comfort is between 30% and 60%. Offices cooled by air conditioning can often be much drier, causing tiredness, respiratory discomfort and dry, itchy eyes. A Washington State University showed that plants release moisture to create a humidity level that perfectly matches the recommended levels of 30% to 60%.

Plants can also regulate temperature levels in an office, reducing the need for air conditioning and heating. Research from The Foliage For Clean Air Council and National Academy of Science showed that choosing and placing plants correctly can lower building heating and cooling costs by as much as 20%.

Improving aesthetics

Plants can help to create a more aesthetically pleasing space, breaking down the harsh, sterile lines of an office environment. This is more pleasing to workers, and it can create a better image for visiting clients. Research from Oxford University suggested plants impacted positively on employee perceptions and dispositions, which helped to increase employee retention.

Having plants in the workplace can also help to reduce noise pollution, reduce stress among workers and boost your green lifestyle.

Benefits of indoor plant hire

One thing that puts some people off introducing plants to the workplace is the work that goes into choosing the right plants, placing them correctly and maintaining them. That’s where indoor plant hire comes in. Companies such as Gaddy’s indoor plant hire can provide advice on which plants would be best, and can maintain them for a low monthly cost.

An indoor plant hire company would take care of the watering and fertilising, the dusting, cleaning and pruning, as well as disease identification and treatment. When plants need replacing or rotating, the plant hire company would take care of that too.

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