Quantcast

Increase Office Morale and Productivity With Indoor Plant Hire

Numerous studies from all over the world have highlighted the many benefits of having indoor plants in the workplace. From improved air quality and aesthetics, to increased morale and productivity among workers, there are countless benefits to having plants in an office environment. Here we are going to look at those benefits more closely, as well as the benefits of indoor plant hire.

Benefits of having indoor plants in an office 

Improving air quality

Research by Bio-Safe Incorporated found that air in offices can be up to ten times more polluted than the air outside. Air conditioning is used to circulate air, but no fresh air is brought in from outside. Offices can be packed with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as pollutants from plastics, synthetics, furnishings and solvents.

However, research has shown that rooms with plants have 50% to 60% fewer airborne moulds and bacteria than rooms without plants. Plants do this by sucking nasties such as VOCs and carbon dioxide out of the air, drawing them down into their roots and releasing oxygen back into the environment.

Reducing sickness

Research has shown that plants can help to reduce Sick Building Syndrome and can help to increase worker wellbeing. A study in Norway showed that introducing plants to a workplace decreased absenteeism from 15% to 5%.

Increasing productivity

A Washington State University by Dr Virginia Lohr found that students working in a computer lab that contained plants were 12% more efficient than students doing the same tasks in plant-free labs. Research from Texas A&M University found that both men and women were more productive in plant-filled offices, demonstrating more innovative thinking, and coming up with more ideas and original solutions.

Regulating temperature

The recommended humidity range for human health and comfort is between 30% and 60%. Offices cooled by air conditioning can often be much drier, causing tiredness, respiratory discomfort and dry, itchy eyes. A Washington State University showed that plants release moisture to create a humidity level that perfectly matches the recommended levels of 30% to 60%.

Plants can also regulate temperature levels in an office, reducing the need for air conditioning and heating. Research from The Foliage For Clean Air Council and National Academy of Science showed that choosing and placing plants correctly can lower building heating and cooling costs by as much as 20%.

Improving aesthetics

Plants can help to create a more aesthetically pleasing space, breaking down the harsh, sterile lines of an office environment. This is more pleasing to workers, and it can create a better image for visiting clients. Research from Oxford University suggested plants impacted positively on employee perceptions and dispositions, which helped to increase employee retention.

Having plants in the workplace can also help to reduce noise pollution, reduce stress among workers and boost your green lifestyle.

Benefits of indoor plant hire

One thing that puts some people off introducing plants to the workplace is the work that goes into choosing the right plants, placing them correctly and maintaining them. That’s where indoor plant hire comes in. Companies such as Gaddy’s indoor plant hire can provide advice on which plants would be best, and can maintain them for a low monthly cost.

An indoor plant hire company would take care of the watering and fertilising, the dusting, cleaning and pruning, as well as disease identification and treatment. When plants need replacing or rotating, the plant hire company would take care of that too.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Electric cars recharge at public charging stations. Sven Loeffler / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Ben Jervey

Drivers of electric cars are being unfairly punished by punitive fees in several states, according to a newly published analysis by Consumer Reports. Legislators in 26 states have enacted or proposed special registration fees for electric vehicles (EVs) that the consumer advocacy group found to be more expensive than the gas taxes paid by the driver of an average new gasoline vehicle.

Read More Show Less
A plastic bag sticks to a wire fence in a remote location in the Mourne Mountains, co Down, Northern Ireland. Dave G Kelly / Moment / Getty Images

Ireland is ready to say goodbye to plastic cutlery, plastic balloon sticks and grocery items wrapped in plastic as a way to drastically reduce the amount of waste in Irish landfills, according to the Ireland's national broadcaster, RTE.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
This 1910, power plant, with the U.S. Capitol in the background, is owned by Congress and is the only coal-burning facility in a city that repeatedly violates Clean Air standards. Jahi Chikwendiu / The Washington Post / Getty Images

By Oliver Milman

Two-thirds of Americans believe climate change is either a crisis or a serious problem, with a majority wanting immediate action to address global heating and its damaging consequences, major new polling has found.

Read More Show Less
Organic carrots and radishes at a farmers' market. carterdayne / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Brian Barth

There's something of a civil war brewing in the organic movement.

Read More Show Less
Volunteers participate in 2018's International Coastal Cleanup in (clockwise from top left) the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Norway and Washington, DC. Ocean Conservancy / Gabriel Ortiz, David Kwaku Sakyi, Kristin Folsland Olsen, Emily Brauner

This coming Saturday, Sept. 21 is the International Coastal Cleanup (ICC), the annual Ocean Conservancy event that mobilizes volunteers in more than 100 countries to collect litter from beaches and waterways and record what they find.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Students hold a Youth Strike for Climate Change Protest in London, UK on May 24. Dinendra Haria / SOPA Images / LightRocket via Getty Images

The New York City public schools will allow their 1.1 million students to skip school for Friday's global climate strike, The New York Times reported Monday.

Read More Show Less
The 16-year-old Swede Greta Thunberg speaks during her protest action for more climate protection with a reporter. Steffen Trumpf / picture alliance / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard and Kyle Pope

It's been 30 years since Bill McKibben rang the warning bells about the threat of man-made climate change — first in a piece in The New Yorker, and then in his book, The End of Nature.

Read More Show Less
At the International Motor Show (IAA), climate protestors are calling for a change in transportation politics. © Kevin McElvaney / Greenpeace

Thousands of protestors marched in front of Frankfurt's International Motor Show (IAA) on Saturday to show their disgust with the auto industry's role in the climate crisis. The protestors demanded an end to combustion engines and a shift to more environmentally friendly emissions-free vehicles, as Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less