Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

How Wind Energy Can Conserve Europe's Water and Save Billions

Business

It's no secret that multiple countries within the European Union have a strong track record in onshore and offshore wind energy. However, the latest report from the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA) frames the advances of wind energy around an issue that won't disappear anytime soon—water security.

EWEA's Saving Water With Wind Energy begins with statistics from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development showing that 40 percent 0f the world’s population will face severe water stress conditions by 2050. That could include water pollution and scarcity. In the EU, 11 percent of the population had already been impacted by scarcity by 2007. Droughts of the past 30 years in the continent cost the U.S. equivalent of $1.4 billion.

What uses the most water in the EU? Power production to cool thermal or nuclear power plants checks in at 44 percent. Meanwhile, the EU says wind power uses virtually no water.

"Replacing thermal and nuclear power stations with wind energy is therefore a key step in the fight to conserve and protect Europe’s precious water resource and hedge against future power shortages due to water-dependent electricity production," the report reads.

The report also found:

  • The water used by thermal electricity generation and nuclear is about the same as the average annual household water usage of 82 million EU citizens or the entire population of Germany
  • Wind energy has helped avoid the use of 1.2 billion cubic meters of water in 2012. That's about the amount of the average annual household water use of about 22 million EU citizens
  • Wind power will avoid between 4.3 billion and 6.4 billion cubic meters of water
  • In 2030, avoided water costs could total between $16.3 billion and $24 billion, as a result of increased wind energy.

"To maximize wind energy’s water protection benefits—as well as its other benefits such as fossil fuel import reduction, job creation and carbon dioxide emission reduction—the EU must put in place an ambitious post-2020 EU climate and energy framework including an ambitious binding renewables target for 2030," the report suggests.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Deserted view of NH24 near Akshardham Temple on day nine of the 21-day nationwide lockdown to curb the spread of coronavirus on April 2, 2020 in New Delhi, India. Raj K Raj / Hindustan Times via Getty Images

India is home to 21 of the world's 30 most polluted cities, but recently air pollution levels have started to drop dramatically as the second-most populated nation endures the second week of a 21-day lockdown amidst coronavirus fears, according to The Weather Channel.

Read More Show Less
A Unicef social mobilizer uses a speaker as she carries out public health awareness to prevent the spread and detect the symptoms of the COVID-19 coronavirus by UNICEF at Mangateen IDP camp in Juba, South Sudan on April 2. ALEX MCBRIDE / AFP / Getty Images

By Eddie Ndopu

  • South Africa is ground zero for the coronavirus pandemic in Africa.
  • Its townships are typical of high-density neighbourhoods across the continent where self-isolation will be extremely challenging.
  • The failure to eradicate extreme poverty is a threat beyond the countries in question.
Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The outside of the Food and Drug Administration headquarters in White Oak, Md. on Nov. 9, 2015. Al Drago / CQ Roll Call

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of two malarial drugs to treat and prevent COVID-19, the respiratory infection caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus, despite only anecdotal evidence that either is proven effective in treating or slowing the progression of the disease in seriously ill patients.

Read More Show Less
Some speculate that the dissemination of the Antarctic beeches or Nothofagus moorei (seen above in Australia) dates to the time when Antarctica, Australia and South America were connected. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

A team of scientists drilled into the ground near the South Pole to discover forest and fossils from the Cretaceous nearly 90 million years ago, which is the time when dinosaurs roamed the Earth, as the BBC reported.

Read More Show Less
The recovery of elephant seals is one of the "signs of hope" that scientists say show the oceans can recover swiftly if we let them. NOAA / CC BY 2.0

The challenges facing the world's oceans are well known: plastic pollution could crowd out fish by 2050, and the climate crisis could wipe out coral reefs by 2100.

Read More Show Less