Quantcast

Gone Forever

World Wildlife Federation

World Wildlife Federation (WWF) and the International Rhino Foundation (IRF) confirmed the extinction of the Javan rhinoceros in Vietnam Oct. 25, 2011.

A WWF report concludes:

• Poaching was likely the cause of death. The last rhino was found with a bullet in its
leg and its horn removed.

• Ineffective protection by the park was ultimately the cause of extinction.

• Illegal hunting for wildlife trade continues to threaten many species in Vietnam including the tiger, Asian elephant and saola.

The Javan rhinoceros was believed to be extinct from mainland Asia, but in 1988 one was hunted and lead to the discovery of a small population.

In 2004, a survey conducted by WWF, Cat Tien National Park and Queen’s University in Canada revealed at least two rhinos were living in the park. The report suggests that one of the individuals was lost between then and the beginning of WWF’s survey in 2009.

Hope for Javan Rhinos in Indonesia

There are still Javan rhinos left in the wild. As few as 40 critically endangered rhinos live in a small national park in Indonesia. The protection and expansion of this remaining population is crucial for the survival of the rhinos.

WWF is working to:

• Protect the remaining Javan rhinos from poaching

• Monitor the existing population

• Establish a second population through translocation, which establishes different populations of a species in more than one area

Partners in these efforts include the Indonesian government, the International Rhino Foundation, the Indonesian Rhino Foundation, the IUCN/SSC Rhino Specialist Group, Aaranyak, the Eijkman Institute and local communities.

How You Can Help

Watch video footage of a Javan rhino and her calf in Indonesia and share with others

Support our work to save the remaining Javan rhinos

For more information, click here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

By Anita Desikan

The Trump administration is routinely undermining your ability — and mine, and everyone else's in this country — to exercise our democratic rights to provide input on the administration's proposed actions through the public comment process. Public comments are just what they sound like: an opportunity for anyone in the public, both individuals and organizations, to submit a comment on a proposed rule that federal agencies are required by law to read and take into account. Public comments can raise the profile of an issue, can help amplify the voices of affected communities, and can show policymakers whether a proposal has broad support or is wildly unpopular.

Read More Show Less
Alena Gamm / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson, MScFN

Bananas are one of the world's most popular fruits.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The Climate Reality Project

Picture this: a world where chocolate is as rare as gold. No more five-dollar bags of candy on Halloween. No more boxes of truffles on Valentine's day. No more roasting s'mores by the campfire. No more hot chocolate on a cold winter's day.

Who wants to live in a world like that?

Read More Show Less
PxHere

By Lisa Wartenberg, MFA, RD, LD

Honey and vinegar have been used for medicinal and culinary purposes for thousands of years, with folk medicine often combining the two as a health tonic (1Trusted Source).

Read More Show Less
Fabian Krause / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Streit, MS, RDN, LD

Paprika is a spice made from the dried peppers of the plant Capsicum annuum.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Water protectors of all persuasions gathered in talking circles at Borderland Ranch in Pe'Sla, the heart of the sacred Black Hills, during the first Sovereign Sisters Gathering. At the center are Cheryl Angel in red and white and on her left, Lyla June. Tracy Barnett

By Tracy L. Barnett

Sources reviewed this article for accuracy.

For Sicangu Lakota water protector Cheryl Angel, Standing Rock helped her define what she stands against: an economy rooted in extraction of resources and exploitation of people and planet. It wasn't until she'd had some distance that the vision of what she stands for came into focus.

Read More Show Less
Hedges, 2019 © Hugh Hayden. All photos courtesy of Lisson Gallery

By Patrick Rogers

"I'm really into trees," said the sculptor Hugh Hayden. "I'm drawn to plants."

Read More Show Less
BruceBlock / iStock / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Thanks to their high concentration of powerful plant compounds, foods with a natural purple hue offer a wide array of health benefits.

Read More Show Less