Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Global Renewable Energy Jobs Grow to 6.5 Million​

Business
Global Renewable Energy Jobs Grow to 6.5 Million​

Renewable energy employment has topped a combined 6.5 million jobs around the globe, according to a new report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). 

 Released Monday morning, Renewable Energy and Jobs—Annual Review 2014 shows that jobs in the wind, solar and other clean energy sectors grew by nearly 1 million from 2012 to 2013.

China, Brazil, the U.S., India, Germany, Spain and Bangladesh are the largest employer countries for renewable energy.

[blackoutgallery id="334068"]

"With 6.5 million people directly or indirectly employed in renewable energy, the sector is proving that it is no longer a niche, it has become a significant employer worldwide,” IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin said in a statement. “The insights into shifts along segments of the value-chain revealed in the report are crucial to developing policy that strengthens job growth in this important sector of the economy.”

The top sectors for renewable energy employment are solar photovoltaic (PV), biofuels, wind, modern biomass and biogas. Regional shifts, industry realignments, growing competition and advances in technologies and manufacturing processes are the top drivers for the year-to-year job growth, according to the report.

“Surging demand for solar PV in China and Japan has increased employment in the installation sector and eased some PV module over-supply concerns,” said Rabia Ferroukhi, head of the Knowledge, Policy and Finance division at IRENA and the report's lead author. “Consequently some Chinese manufacturers are now adding capacity.”

The U.S. is the largest biofuels producer in the world, while Brazil remains as the sector's largest employer. China and Canada paced wind employment's growth in 2013.

IRENA will present the report Monday at the Clean Energy Ministerial in Seoul, South Korea, where the energy ministers and/or high-ranking officials from 23 countries are expected to attend.

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

Solar Heating and Cooling Could Save $61B, Create 50,250 Jobs By 2050

Stanford Professor’s 50-State Plan For 100-Percent Renewable Energy

——–

Colette Pichon Battle, attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy. Colette Pichon Battle

By Karen L. Smith-Janssen

Colette Pichon Battle gave a December 2019 TEDWomen Talk on the stark realities of climate change displacement, and people took notice. The video racked up a million views in about two weeks. The attorney, founder, and executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law & Policy (GCCLP) advocates for climate justice in communities of color. Confronted with evidence showing how her own South Louisiana coastal home of Bayou Liberty will be lost to flooding in coming years, the 2019 Obama Fellow dedicates herself to helping others still reeling from the impacts of Katrina face the heavy toll that climate change has taken—and will take—on their lives and homelands. Her work focuses on strengthening multiracial coalitions, advocating for federal, state, and local disaster mitigation measures, and redirecting resources toward Black communities across the Gulf South.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A palm tree plantation in Malaysia. Yann Arthus-Bertrand / Getty Images Plus

Between 2000 and 2013, Earth lost an area of undisturbed ecosystems roughly the size of Mexico.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A home burns during the Bobcat Fire in Juniper Hills, California on September 18, 2020. Kyle Grillot / AFP/ Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

"These are not just wildfires, they are climate fires," Jay Inslee, Governor of Washington State, said as he stood amid the charred remains of the town of Malden west of Seattle earlier this month. "This is not an act of God," he added. "This has happened because we have changed the climate of the state of Washington in dramatic ways."

Read More Show Less
A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world. PickPik

A new report from Oxfam found that the wealthiest one percent of the world produced a carbon footprint that was more than double that of the bottom 50 percent of the world, The Guardian reported. The study examined 25 years of carbon dioxide emissions and wealth inequality from 1990 to 2015.

Read More Show Less
The label of one of the recalled thyroid medications. FDA

If you are taking medication for an underactive thyroid, check your prescription.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch