Quantcast

Factory Farms Are a #LoadOfCrap, Says New Report

Food

Factory farming has been expanding in the U.S. over the last two decades, and the size of those farms has increased dramatically—dominating the market, squeezing out smaller producers and setting the agenda for farming practices—to the detriment of food consumers.

That's the conclusion of a new study, Factory Farm Nation: 2015 Edition, released by Food & Water Watch.

"Over the last two decades, small- and medium-scale farms raising livestock have given way to factory farms that confine thousands of cows, hogs and chickens in tightly packed facilities," says the report. "Farmers have adopted factory farming practices largely at the behest of the largest meatpackers, pork processors, poultry companies and dairy processors. The largest of these agribusinesses are practically monopolies, controlling what consumers get to eat, what they pay for groceries and what prices farmers receive for their livestock."

This is occurring as the public is marching in the other direction, as demonstrated by McDonald's declining profits, the positive public response to Chipotle's moving toward organic, non-GMO and locally raised products, and raised awareness of the issues around meat and dairy products containing growth hormones and antibiotics used for preventive purposes due to factory farming confinement practices.

Factory Farm Nation cites the power of agribusiness monopolies, along with what it refers to as "misguided farm policies," with causing factory farms to explode in size and adopt practices that are unhealthy for consumers and for the environment.

“As I documented in my book Foodopoly, corporate monopolies continue to run our food system, exercising unchecked power over the food that Americans feed their families," said Food & Water Watch executive director Wenonah Hauter. "As factory farms grow in size and number, so too do the problems they create, such as increased water and air pollution; fewer markets for independent, pasture-based farmers; public health burdens like antibiotic-resistant bacteria; and large-scale food safety risks for consumers.”

The report analyzes how much each type of factory livestock operation has grown, using U.S. Department of Agriculture data from 1997, 2002, 1997 and 2012, finding that both the size and number of such farms and the number of animals they raise has grown dramatically in most cases. Among other things, it found:

  • The total number of livestock on the largest factory farms grew by 20 percent between 2002 and 2012, increasing from 23.7 to 28.5 million. “Livestock units” measures animals based on their weight.
  • These livestock produced 369 million tons of manure in 2012, 13 times as much as produced by the entire U.S. population.
  • The number of dairy cows on factory farms doubled, and the average dairy factory farm size increased by 49.1 percent between 1997 and 2012. The number of cows on farms with more than 500-head grew 120.9 percent, from 2.5 to 5.6 million in that time.
  • The number of hogs on factory farms increased by 37.1 percent, and the average farm size grew 68.4  percent from 1997 to 2012.
  • The number of broiler chickens on factory farms—ones that sold more than half a million a year—grew 79.9 percent percent from 1997 to 1.05 billion in 2012 billion.  And the average size of U.S. broiler chicken operations rose 5.9 percent in the same period, from 157,000 to 166,000 birds. In California and Nevada, the average chicken farm raised more than 500,000 birds in 2012.
  • The number of egg-laying hens on factory farms with more than 100,000 birds grew 2.48 percent from 1997 to 2012. The average egg operations has grown by 74.2 percent in 15 years, to an average size of 695,000 birds in 2012.
  • The number of beef cattle on feedlots rose five percent from 2002 to 2012. The average size increased 13.7 percent from 2007 to 2012 and continued to grow despite the drought reducing the overall number of animals.

Read page 1

Food & Water Watch provides an interactive map so you can visualize where these factory farms have grown and how they have expanded.

With the size of the operations comes political power that drives weaker environmental rules which allows their size to increase, creating a vicious cycle that gives consumers shrinking choices and puts them at more danger from food-borne illnesses.

“Waste from factory farms is an enormous problem, one that we cannot begin to curb through market-based approaches such as pollution trading, which will not actually stop factory farms from polluting our nation’s water ways,” said Hauter. “In reality, pollution trading simply moves the problem around, shifting waste to other watersheds, rather than tackling the issue that factory farms concentrate too many animals—and too much waste—in one place.”

"As factory farms grow in size and numbers, so too do the problems they create," said Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch. Photo credit: Food & Water Watch

Food & Water Watch also made a series of recommendations. It suggests that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency declare a moratorium on new factory farms and the expansion of existing ones, and enforce rules to prevent pollution, such as giant manure lagoon of unprocessed animal waste; that the Department of Justice block future mergers and consolidation of facilities to create still larger ones; that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ban use of antibiotics to prevent the spread of disease in overcrowded facilities; and that states crack down on the permitting and enforcement of water and air pollution regulations involving factory farms.

Food & Water Watch will call attention to its study results with an electronic billboard, Factory Farms Are a #LoadOfCrap, which will be on display in July in a location far from any factory farms: New York City's Times Square.

"Factory farms produce more than just the majority of the meat, milk and eggs we consume—they breed disease, misery and pollution," said Hauter. "In fact, every day, America’s factory farms produce enough waste to fill the Empire State Building."

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

150,000 Americans Call for Less Meat, More Plants in U.S. Dietary Guidelines

How Meat Consumption Is Linked to Climate Change and Drought

Stunning Aerial Photos Show How Factory Farms Ravage the Earth

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Record flood water levels in Venice hit again on Sunday making this the worst week of flooding in the city in over 50 years.

Read More Show Less

By Brian Barth

Late fall, after the last crops have been harvested, is a time to rest and reflect on the successes and challenges of the gardening year. But for those whose need to putter around in the garden doesn't end when cold weather comes, there's surely a few lingering chores. Get them done now and you'll be ahead of the game in spring.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
(L) Selma Three Stone Engagement Ring. (R) The Greener Diamond Farm Project. MiaDonna

By Bailey Hopp

If you had to choose a diamond for your engagement ring from below or above the ground, which would you pick … and why would you pick it? This is the main question consumers are facing when picking out their diamond engagement ring today. With a dramatic increase in demand for conflict-free lab-grown diamonds, the diamond industry is shifting right before our eyes.

Read More Show Less
(L) 3D graphical representation of a spherical-shaped, measles virus particle that is studded with glycoprotein tubercles.
(R) The measles virus pictured under a microscope. PHIL / CDC

The Pacific Island nation of Samoa declared a state of emergency this week, closed all of its schools and limited the number of public gatherings allowed after a measles outbreak has swept across the country of just 200,000 people, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
Austin Nuñez is Chairman of the Tohono O'odham Nation, which joined with the Hopi and Pascua Yaqui Tribes to fight a proposed open-pit copper mine on sacred sites in Arizona. Mamta Popat

By Alison Cagle

Rising above the Arizona desert, the Santa Rita Mountains cradle 10,000 years of Indigenous history. The Tohono O'odham Nation, Pascua Yaqui Tribe, and Hopi Tribe, among numerous other tribes, have worshipped, foraged, hunted and laid their ancestors to rest in the mountains for generations.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
The Navajo Nation has suffered from limited freshwater resources as a result of climate, insufficient infrastructure, and contamination. They collaborated with NASA to develop the Drought Severity Evaluation Tool. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Native Americans are disproportionately without access to clean water, according to a new report, "Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States: A National Action Plan," to be released this afternoon, which shows that more than two million Americans do not have access to access to running water, indoor plumbing or wastewater services.

Read More Show Less
Wild Exmoor ponies graze on a meadow in the Czech Republic. rapier / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Nanticha Ocharoenchai

In the Czech Republic, horses have become the knights in shining armor. A study published in the Journal for Nature Conservation suggests that returning feral horses to grasslands in Podyjí National Park could help boost the numbers of several threatened butterfly species.

Read More Show Less

Despite huge strides in improving the lives of children since 1989, many of the world's poorest are being left behind, the United Nations children's fund UNICEF warned Monday.

Read More Show Less