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Is a Glass of Wine at Night Healthy?

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Is a Glass of Wine at Night Healthy?

Drinking wine is like a U-shaped curve. A little bit is ok; a little more is bad news. For women, wine can be especially damaging. Why? Increased alcohol load means your liver can't metabolize estrogen well. Increased estrogen in the body can lead to breast cancer. Drinking just one glass of wine a day increases your breast cancer risk by 40 percent.


So, What is the Verdict?

Occasionally enjoying a glass of wine can be part of a healthy diet but only in moderation. Red wine, for example, contains resveratrol, which naturally protects and improves your body's mitochondrial function through its effects on special master aging genes. But make sure you enjoy only the best quality wine out there. I recommend Dry Farm Wines for the best quality and highest integrity wines.

Remember … mitochondria are the part of your cells that create energy. So, supporting healthy development and sustaining them is super important. But as stated above, increased consumption can tax your liver, leading to negative side effects.

For a less harmful and more effective way to support healthy mitochondria, I recommend sticking to these tactics:

  • Exercise regularly and incorporate a mix of different types of exercise. Interval training increases the efficiency and function of mitochondria, while strength training increases the number of mitochondria.
  • Eat whole, real, colorful plant foods which are full of antioxidants and phytonutrients that protect mitochondria. Include 8 to 12 servings of fresh vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts and seeds every day.
  • Increase omega-3 fats. These help to build your mitochondrial membranes.

The final word here is that we need to think of alcohol as a recreational treat. If you drink alcohol, I suggest you limit consumption to one glass, up to three times a week. Remember: One drink equals 5 ounces of wine, 1.5 ounces of hard alcohol or 12 ounces of beer. And again, quality makes all the difference. For the best quality organic wines check out Dry Farm Wines.

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