Quantcast

Canadian Scientists Expose Their Government's Tar Sands Obsession at DC Briefing

Energy

A delegation of Canadian scientists and activists participated in a briefing today at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, to set the record straight on the government’s strategy to undermine anything that might stand in the way of its goals to triple tar sands production, according to a Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Sierra Club press release.

From left to right: Bill Burton, David Suzuki, Franke James, Tzeporah Berman, Tim Gray, Danny Harvey at the National Press Club's breakfast briefing, Oct. 11. Photo credit: Rocky Kistner/ NRDC

As the Canadian government launches a $24 million pro-tar sands advertising campaign, Prime Minister Stephen Harper digs his heels in by saying he “won’t take no” for an answer on the Keystone XL pipeline.

“The Harper government will stop at nothing to ruthlessly promote tar sands expansion," said Tzeporah Berman, Canadian author and resource development activist, and panel member at today's briefing. "We have witnessed a steady erosion of rights and a concerted attack on critical environmental legislation, all as part of a plan to turn our economy towards tar sands. Democratic opposition is no longer tolerated in Stephen Harper’s Canada.”

At a breakfast briefing this morning, a delegation—featuring respected scientists, artists and activists—presented a compelling case to President Obama that Canada was unfit to make any sort of climate deal in exchange for the Keystone XL. The delegation described how the government’s tar sands obsession has cost Canada its international credibility, according to the NRDC.

“The Canadian government has failed to implement a plan to reduce carbon pollution," said Tim Gray, executive director of Environmental Defence Canada. "It is on track to miss both its own and international targets for carbon emissions reduction, yet is recklessly pursuing plans to triple tar sands production. To date, the government has shown no ability to act as a credible partner to the U.S. on climate actions.”

During the press event today, the delegation presented the following examples on how the Canadian government's concerted efforts cleared the path for reckless tar sands expansion:

  • An aggressive $24 million public relations blitz to paint the tar sands as an environmentally responsible project.
  • More than 6 years’ worth of failed climate plans and broken promises when it comes to controlling pollution from the tar sands.
  • Failure to take meaningful action on the current Canadian emissions trajectory, which will significantly miss Canada’s climate goal—one that is shared with the U.S.
  • Dismantling of decades worth of environmental legislation, leading to a withdrawal of federal protection of more than 2 million rivers and lakes, including waterways that would have triggered environmental assessment in pipeline projects.
  • Changes to public participation legislation in environmental hearings, including lengthy and arbitrary application processes to participate or submit comments in hearings.
  • Implementing communications policies that require federal scientists to have all media lines pre-approved, leading to an 80 percent decline in coverage of climate change in the first year the policy was implemented.
  • Public and internal attacks by government on citizens, artists and First Nations who express concern about the impacts of tar sands and related infrastructure.

“There is a systematic attack on science and democracy taking place in Canada, and the Harper government isn’t even trying to hide it," said scientist Dr. David Suzuki. "But scientists cannot and will not be silenced, not when we are facing an irreversible climate catastrophe like the tar sands.”

Bill Burton, David Suzuki, Franke James, Tzeporah Berman at the National Press Club's breakfast briefing, Oct. 11. Photo credit: Rocky Kistner/ NRDC

“Canadians’ right to free expression is being quietly eroded by a pro-oil government insistent on promoting tar sands and silencing anyone who might interfere with those plans," said panel member Franke James, a Canadian artist. "Rather than the friendly neighbor to the north, Canada has become the dirty old man.”

Plans to triple tar sands production by 2030 are incompatible with Canada and the U.S.’ shared commitment to keep global temperature changes below two degree Celsius.

“Under President Obama’s leadership, the U.S. is on track to meet our 2020 climate targets," said Bill Burton, of the League of Conservation Voters. "It would be counter-productive and counter-intuitive to implement strong climate policies at home, while giving Canada the go-ahead to develop its tar sands industry by approving Keystone XL.” 

Visit EcoWatch’s TAR SANDS and KEYSTONE XL page for more related news on this topic.

——–

 

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pexels

By Ketura Persellin

Global consumption of beef, lamb and goat is expected to rise by almost 90 percent between 2010 and 2050. But that doesn't mean you need to eat more meat. In fact, recent news from Washington gives you even less confidence in your meat: Pork inspections may be taken over by the industry itself, if a Trump administration proposal goes into effect, putting tests for deadly pathogens into the hands of line workers.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Kaitlyn Berkheiser

While enjoying an occasional alcoholic beverage is unlikely to harm your health, drinking in excess can have substantial negative effects on your body and well-being.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
MStudioImages / E+ / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

Backpacking is an exciting way to explore the wilderness or travel to foreign countries on a budget.

Read More Show Less
Tim P. Whitby / 21st Century Fox / Getty Images

The beauty products we put on our skin can have important consequences for our health. Just this March, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that some Claire's cosmetics had tested positive for asbestos. But the FDA could only issue a warning, not a recall, because current law does not empower the agency to do so.

Michelle Pfeiffer wants to change that.

The actress and Environmental Working Group (EWG) board member was spotted on Capitol Hill Thursday lobbying lawmakers on behalf of a bill that would increase oversight of the cosmetics industry, The Washington Post reported.

Read More Show Less
A protest march against the Line 3 pipeline in St. Paul, Minnesota on May 18, 2018. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

By Collin Rees

We know that people power can stop dangerous fossil fuel projects like the proposed Line 3 tar sands oil pipeline in Minnesota, because we've proved it over and over again — and recently we've had two more big wins.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Scientists released a study showing that a million species are at risk for extinction, but it was largely ignored by the corporate news media. Danny Perez Photography / Flickr / CC

By Julia Conley

Scientists at the United Nations' intergovernmental body focusing on biodiversity sounded alarms earlier this month with its report on the looming potential extinction of one million species — but few heard their calls, according to a German newspaper report.

Read More Show Less
DoneGood

By Cullen Schwarz

Ethical shopping is a somewhat new phenomenon. We're far more familiar with the "tried and tested" methods of doing good, like donating our money or time.

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

Summer is fast approaching, which means it's time to stock up on sunscreen to ward off the harmful effects of sun exposure. Not all sunscreens are created equally, however.

Read More Show Less