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8 Festive Vegan Drinks to Keep You Cozy This Winter

Food
Champurrado (Mexican hot chocolate) is a beloved holiday favorite. PETA

By Zachary Toliver

Looking for warm vegan holiday drinks to help you deal with the short days and cold weather? This time of year, we could all use a steamy cup of cheer during the holiday chaos. Have a festive, cozy winter with these delicious options. (Note that you must be 21 to enjoy some of the recipes.)


1. Oh So Fragrant Mulled Wine

The list wouldn't be complete without mulled wine. Warming chilly folks for more than 2,000 years, it's a winter staple that's easy to make. Try this delicious Traditional German Hot Mulled Wine by The Edgy Veg for some coziness from the old country. And check out our guide to vegan wine so you can avoid "products" made with animal parts. Do I need to remind you to drink responsibly? Because, you know, drink responsibly.

2. Mulled Apple Cider (With or Without the Ingredients for Adulting)

Speaking of "mulling," add some heat and spices to apple cider to fill your home with the scent of the holidays. Vegan writer Becky Striepe of Glue & Glitter offers a delicious mulled cider recipe that can be made with or without alcohol.

3. Top o' the Mornin' to Ya Irish Coffee

We're not above throwing a little Baileys Almande Almondmilk Liqueur and Jameson Irish Whiskey into our coffee. But if you're looking to make your own rich (and strong) vegan Irish cream from scratch, try this recipe from Oh She Glows. It certainly pours all the bite of House of Pain into your morning Joe.

4. Mitten-Warming Hot Chocolate

Nothing beats the sweet joy of warm hot cocoa (seriously, it's liquid chocolate!). Some hot cocoas are premixed with cow's milk, but who needs that? Stop supporting the cruelty inherent in the dairy industry, and check out PETA's favorite delightful vegan hot chocolate options.

5. Vegan Hot Toddy

I wait all year for an excuse to sip on a hot toddy. But it's aggravating when some barkeep wants to pour bee vomit into my winter holiday escape. Thankfully, Minimalist Baker concocted a spicy, enchanting vegan version of this cold weather classic. No more groaning at the bar for me.

6. Vegan Peppermint Chocolate That You Can Drink!

Peppermint may as well be the official flavor of the holiday season. The kind culinary artists at Minimalist Baker outdid themselves once again with their simple yet tasty hot peppermint chocolate beverage. Best of all, no cows were separated from their calves in order to make this festive drink.

7. Masala Chai

Want to impress friends and family with your well-traveled wisdom? Spice up your winter with flavors from the East. Originating in India, masala chai has gained popularity around the world for its bold aroma and flavor. Try this recipe from Vegan Richa, which was kind enough to include directions for mixing your own chai spice-masala blend from scratch.

8. Champurrado (Mexican Hot Chocolate)

Mexican chocolate and piloncillo? Check. Creamy soy milk simmered with masa harina for a delicious taste and texture? Check. Cinnamon and anise for spiced perfection? Check. With all these tasty ingredients, it's no wonder that champurrado is a beloved holiday favorite. Try the delicious recipe from PETA Latino today.

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