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14 Edible Plants You Can Grow Indoors

Food
14 Edible Plants You Can Grow Indoors

By Elizabeth King, Pound Place

Many of us dream of having our own vegetable patch, but it can be challenging to find the ideal space—and that's assuming you have a garden at all. If you don't then you're in luck, you don't need a large outdoor plot to grow all your ideal crops, for many edible plants all you need is a sunny spot inside.

The idea of growing an indoor farm, full of healthy food you can spoil yourself with over summer may sound too good to be true. But with a little love and care, whether you live in a house or a flat, you can grow a variety of fresh vegetables, fruit and even edible flowers ready for your next dinner party—guaranteed to impress.

But the benefits don't stop there, growing your own greenery will give the satisfaction of harvesting your own foodstuff, save you money and added health benefits making your five a day a walk in the park. You might even start replacing that takeaway pizza with home-grown vegetables packed with vitamins and minerals.

You can grow almost any plants indoors with a loving hand, best growth occurs in areas that receive plenty of sunlight, such as windowsills. But for those of you who just don't have a sunny spot to make the most of, grow lights can allow you to cultivate your edible plants in even the darkest of corners.

Although growing conditions vary from plant to plant, a few general rules should be followed. If you're starting completely from scratch, sowing seeds on moistened soil, covered with plastic wrap and kept in a warm area will get your plants off to the best possible start. Also ensuring all pots and containers have drainage holes or a layer of grit to prevent root rot and overwatering will make sure your plants stay strong and healthy.

For more on edible plants you can grow indoors–including sowing and harvesting times—check out our helpful infographic below.

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