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Youth Climate Strike Coming to U.S. Next Month

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ZeroHour Climate March in Pittsburgh. Mark Dixon / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

A sea of students are taking part in climate strikes around the world, and on March 15, young activists in the U.S. will add their voices to the escalating #FridaysForFuture movement.

Ever since 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg called for the first global climate strike last month, it has become a weekly routine for students to skip class on Fridays to march for their futures and those of future generations.


Now, kids, teens and young adults in the U.S. will take their own action with support from environmental groups such 350.org, Extinction Rebellion and the Sunrise Movement, Earther reported.

"If we're not going to have a future, then school won't matter any more," one of the organizers, 13-year-old New Yorker Alexandria Villasenor, told Earther about why American students should join the strike next month.

Villasenor has been part of the youth-led strike for months and endured sit-in last weekend in New York City as a polar vortex brought bone-chilling cold to the Big Apple.

"I prepared all week for this and realized climate change will force us to live differently and deal with more extreme weather. People are dying right now, and we need to #ActOnClimate!" she tweeted.

Climate strikes have taken place in cities around Europe, Australia and elsewhere. The fourth straight rally in Brussels on Jan. 31 drew as many as 35,000 student participants.

The youngsters are demanding their leaders and older generations take immediate climate action.

Teen climate activist Jamie Margolin, the founder of This is Zero Hour, said on Twitter that youth across the U.S. will be taking to the streets on March 15 "to show our legislators that we need a Green New Deal," referring to the insurgent policy proposal to fight climate change and to move the U.S. to a sustainable future.

Margolin also praised strike co-leaders such as Isra Hirsi and Haven Coleman for their work in bringing the climate revolution to American shores.

"This #ClimateStrike is being organized by amazing young women like @israhirsi & @havenruthie + so many more! Young girls are leading the climate movement!" she wrote.

According to Earther, strikers in Australia and Europe plan to join the U.S. contingent in solidarity, and action is also planned in Uganda and Thailand.

For those of you who are interested in striking or if you'd like to lead your hometown in a strike, check out this link.

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