Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Video: Economics is the Achilles Heel of Fracking

Energy
Video: Economics is the Achilles Heel of Fracking

On Monday, Dec. 16, EcoWatch featured a live briefing and conversation with Richard Heinberg and Deborah Rogers as they explored how the anti-fracking community can turn the fracking industry's biggest weapon into their greatest vulnerability.

Hosted by Americans Against Fracking, Energy Policy Forum, Post Carbon Institute and Stop the Frack Attack, the forum addressed how the fracking industry has used the so-called "shale revolution" to justify the massive spread of drilling, despite strong environmental concerns and community opposition. The industry claims the U.S. is undergoing an energy revolution, leading the country to energy independence with huge economic benefits to communities. Heinberg and Rogers poke holes in the industry's promise of plenty and reveal fracking as a "short-term bubble, leaving communities with little gain and a whole lot of pain."

Richard Heinberg is senior fellow of the Post Carbon Institute and is widely regarded as one of the world’s foremost educators about the need to urgently transition away from fossil fuels. He is the author of 11 books including The Party's Over, The End of Growth and Snake Oil. He has given hundreds of presentations and media interviews around the world and his award winning animations have been viewed by more than 1.5 million people.

Deborah Rogers is founder of Energy Policy Forum and is recognized as an outspoken expert on the financials and economics of the shale gas/oil industry. A former Wall Street investment banker, Rogers has written extensively about the role of investment banks in the shale gas boom. She has spoken widely in communities around the country, and has been featured in The New York Times, PBS, MSNBC, NPR and elsewhere. 

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

Recycling and general waste plastic wheelie bins awaiting collection for disposal in Newport, Rhode Island. Tim Graham / Getty Images

Reduce. Reuse. Recycle. According to The National Museum of American History, this popular slogan, with its iconic three arrows forming a triangle, embodied a national call to action to save the environment in the 1970s. In that same decade, the first Earth Day happened, the EPA was formed and Congress passed the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, encouraging recycling and conservation of resources, Enviro Inc. reported.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The coal-fired Huaneng Power Plant in Huai 'an City, Jiangsu Province, China on Sept. 13, 2020. Costfoto / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

One of the silver linings of the coronavirus pandemic was the record drop in greenhouse gas emissions following national lockdowns. But that drop is set to all but reverse as economies begin to recover, the International Energy Agency (IEA) warned Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A grizzly bear killed an outdoor guide in a rare attack near Yellowstone Park. William Campbell / Corbis / Getty Images

A backcountry guide has died after being mauled by a grizzly bear near Yellowstone National Park.

Read More Show Less
Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) re-introduces the Green New Deal in Washington, D.C. on April 20, 2021. Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

In the latest of a flurry of proposed Green New Deal legislation, Reps. Cori Bush and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez on Monday introduced the Green New Deal for Cities Act of 2021, a $1 trillion plan to "tackle the environmental injustices that are making us and our children sick, costing us our homes, and destroying our planet."

Read More Show Less
Offshore oil and gas drillers have left more than 18,000 miles of pipelines at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Offshore oil and gas drillers have discarded and abandoned more than 18,000 miles of pipelines on the floor of the Gulf of Mexico since the 1960s, a report from the Government Accountability Office says.

Read More Show Less