Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Vaping Damages Blood Vessels After Just One Use, New Study Says

Health + Wellness
Vaping Damages Blood Vessels After Just One Use, New Study Says
Vaping impaired the circulatory systems of people in a new study. bulentumut / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Vaping one time — even without nicotine — can damage blood vessels, reduce blood flow and create dangerous toxins, according to a new study published in the journal Radiology.


The study found that the heat created when e-cigarettes turn liquid into vapor stirs the compounds into toxic particles, which damage blood vessels. To perform the study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine took an MRI scan of 31 healthy non-smokers before and after vaping nicotine-free e-cigarettes.

The study participants took 3-second drags 16 times on an e-cigarette that had tobacco flavoring and sweeteners, but no nicotine, as NBC News reported. The researchers found that after vaping, blood flow decreased in the femoral artery — the main artery that delivers blood to the thigh and the leg. In fact, the participants had had worse circulation, stiffer arteries and less oxygen in their blood.

"The results of our study defeat the notion that e-cigarette vaping is harmless," said Felix Wehrli, the study's principal investigator, as Wired reported.

"Beyond the harmful effects of nicotine, we've shown that vaping has a sudden, immediate effect on the body's vascular function, and could potentially lead to long-term harmful consequences," he said in a statement released by the University of Pennsylvania.

The changes that Wehril and his team noticed reflect the same process in the initial steps of the development of cardiovascular disease, as CNN reported. Though, to be fair, that takes many years to develop.

Specifically, the researchers observed an average 34 percent reduction in the femoral artery's dilation. They also saw that vaping led to a 17.5 percent reduction in peak blood flow, and a 20 percent reduction in oxygen in the veins, according to a press release statement.

The study's lead author, Alessandra Caporale, said in a statement that these findings suggest that vaping can cause significant changes to the inner lining of blood vessels.

"E-cigarettes are advertised as not harmful, and many e-cigarette users are convinced that they are just inhaling water vapor," Caporale said in a statement. "But the solvents, flavorings and additives in the liquid base, after vaporization, expose users to multiple insults to the respiratory tract and blood vessels."

The notion that e-cigarettes are not harmful has faced a backlash recently for marketing its sweet vaping juices to kids. Recently, nearly 100 teens in 14 states reported lung damage after vaping, including 14 hospitalizations in just two states earlier this month, as EcoWatch reported. The problem has gotten so severe that last week the Centers for Disease Control announced it would launch an investigation into the health consequences of smoking e-cigarettes.

While many doctors believe that vaping is healthier than smoking cigarettes, the unknown long-term effect of flavorings, particles, heavy metals and other components used in e-cigarettes has them worried, according to CNN.

This spring, another study that CNN reported on found that e-cigarette flavors, or juice, had toxic effects including weaker cell survival and increased inflammation.

"Inhaling chemicals into your lungs is dangerous," said Erika Sward, a spokesperson for the American Lung Association, which does not recommend that anyone use e-cigarettes, as Wired reported. "E-cigarettes are guilty until proven innocent and we are very much in the guilty stage."

"Nobody knows what it does to the human lung to breathe in and out aerosolized propylene glycol and glycerin over and over. It's an experiment, frankly," said Dr. Robert Jackler, founder of Stanford Research Into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising, at a congressional hearing in July. "We will find out, years from now, the results."

Valley of the Gods in the heart of Bears Ears National Monument. Mint Images / Getty Images

By Sharon Buccino

This week, Secretary Haaland chose a visit to Bears Ears National Monument as her first trip as Interior Secretary. She is spending three days in Bluff, Utah, a small town just outside the monument, listening to representatives of the five tribes who first proposed its designation to President Obama in 2015. This is the same town where former Secretary Sally Jewell spent several hours at a public hearing in July 2016 before recommending the monument's designation to President Obama.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Pexels

By Anthony Richardson, Chhaya Chaudhary, David Schoeman, and Mark John Costello

The tropical water at the equator is renowned for having the richest diversity of marine life on Earth, with vibrant coral reefs and large aggregations of tunas, sea turtles, manta rays and whale sharks. The number of marine species naturally tapers off as you head towards the poles.

Read More Show Less
Trending
"Secrets of the Whales" is a new series that will start streaming on Disney+ on Earth Day. Disney+

In celebration of Earth Day, a star-studded cast is giving fans a rare glimpse into the secret lives of some of the planet's most majestic animals: whales. In "Secrets of the Whales," a four-part documentary series by renowned National Geographic Photographer and Explorer Brian Skerry and Executive Producer James Cameron, viewers plunge deep into the lives and worlds of five different whale species.

Read More Show Less
Spring is an excellent time to begin bird watching in earnest. Eugenio Marongiu / Cultura / Getty Images

The coronavirus has isolated many of us in our homes this year. We've been forced to slow down a little, maybe looking out our windows, becoming more in tune with the rhythms of our yards. Perhaps we've begun to notice more, like the birds hopping around in the bushes out back, wondering (maybe for the first time) what they are.

Read More Show Less
The brown pelican is seen on Queen Bess Island in Louisiana in March 2021. Casey Wright / LDWF biologist

Who says you can't go home again?

Read More Show Less