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Two College Students Show How to Grow Solutions

Insights + Opinion
Two College Students Show How to Grow Solutions

People always ask me how I stay optimistic in the face of so much bad news about the environment. Easy: I stop and look around me at all the people who are working to make the situation better.
 
Two of those people are college students Alex Freid and Amira Odeh.

Amira Odeh fosters sustainable water consumption at the University of

Puerto Rico’s Rio Piedras campus. Photo courtesy of Brower Youth Awards

I sat down and talked with Alex and Amira in the latest installment of The Good Stuff, our monthly podcast.

Appalled at the sheer volume of “trash” that overwhelmed his campus on moveout week, Alex came up with an innovative solution for his school that is now being replicated on campuses across the country.
 
Amira Odeh loves the beaches in her country, Puerto Rico, and was distraught by the plastic waste littering the shoreline. She knew her individual actions weren’t enough, so she founded the No Mas Botellas campaign.
 
These two college heroes are inspiring real-life examples of what it looks like to grow solutions.
 
I hope you enjoy this episode of The Good Stuff.

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