Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Trace Your Food Back to the Farm With RealTimeFarms.com

Food

The local food movement in the U.S. has continued to evolve over the past several decades, with local food systems growing immensely, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Direct-to-consumer marketing of local foods totaled $1.2 billion in 2007, compared with $551 million only a decade before. The number of farmers markets in the U.S. quadrupled from 1994 to 2013, expanding from 1,755 to 8,144 markets nationwide.

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) saw even greater gains. In two decades, the number of national CSAs exploded from a total of 2 in 1986 to 1,144 in 2005. Early, conservative 2012 estimates showed the number of CSAs exceeding 4,500, leading the USDA to believe that there were more than 6,000 operating at the time.

As the local food system continues to expand, RealTimeFarms.com aims to help consumers take advantage of this growth.

RealTimeFarms.com is a food guide that helps consumers make informed food choices. Photo credit: Nicholas A. Tonelli / flickr

RealTimeFarms.com, recently acquired by Food52, is a nationwide food guide that allows you to trace the food you eat back to the farm. The site’s Food Web links you to thousands of farmsfood artisansfarmers markets and eateries that source local food. The organizations featured on their Food Web are documented by Food Warriors, educational interns who visit farms, the artisans’ places of work and markets to document growing practices and general procedures. Site visitors can also search for local food vendors using the location finder or map on the main page.

By making the trail of food from farm to fork more visible RealTimeFarms.com enables consumers to make more informed choices about what they eat. Being aware of where food comes from will allow consumers to help build both local communities and a sustainable food system.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

5 Ways to Guarantee a Successful WWOOFing Experience

Vertical Farms: The Future of Agriculture?

12 Universities Leading the Charge in Serving Locally-Sourced Food

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A view of a washed out road near Utuado, Puerto Rico, after a Coast Guard Air Station Borinquen MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew dropped relief supplies to residents Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017. The locals were stranded after Hurricane Maria by washed out roads and mudslides. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Eric D. Woodall / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Coral Natalie Negrón Almodóvar

The Earth began to shake as Tamar Hernández drove to visit her mother in Yauco, Puerto Rico, on Dec. 28, 2019. She did not feel that first tremor — she felt only the ensuing aftershocks — but she worried because her mother had an ankle injury and could not walk. Then Hernández thought, "What if something worse is coming our way?"

Read More
Flooded battery park tunnel is seen after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. CC BY 2.0

President Trump has long touted the efficacy of walls, funneling billions of Defense Department dollars to build a wall on the southern border. However, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) released a study that included plans for a sea wall to protect New Yorkers from sea-level rise and catastrophic storms like Hurricane Sandy, Trump mocked it as ineffective and unsightly.

Read More
Sponsored
A general view of fire damaged country in the The Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area near the town of Blackheath on Feb. 21, 2020 in Blackheath, Australia. Brook Mitchell / Getty Images

In a post-mortem of the Australian bushfires, which raged for five months, scientists have concluded that their intensity and duration far surpassed what climate models had predicted, according to a study published yesterday in Nature Climate Change.

Read More
Sea level rise causes water to spill over from the Lafayette River onto Llewellyn Ave in Norfolk, Virginia just after high tide on Aug. 5, 2017. This road floods often, even when there is no rain. Skyler Ballard / Chesapeake Bay Program

By Tim Radford

The Texan city of Houston is about to grow in unexpected ways, thanks to the rising tides. So will Dallas. Real estate agents in Atlanta, Georgia; Denver, Colorado; and Las Vegas, Nevada could expect to do roaring business.

Read More
Malala Yousafzai (left) and Greta Thunberg (right) met in Oxford University Tuesday. Wikimedia Commons / CC BY 2.0

What happens when a famous school striker meets a renowned campaigner for education rights?

Read More