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Top 25 American Cities With the Best Public Transit

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Top 25 American Cities With the Best Public Transit

Think you live in one of the top U.S. cities for public transit? Now you can find out where your city stacks up.

The finance information site SmartAsset analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 American Communities Survey to rank major cities' public transit systems. Researchers used five metrics to compare cities with a population of more than 175,000 people.

Researchers compared:

  • Average commute time

  • The percentage difference between commute times of drivers and transit users

  • Percentage of commuters who use public transit

  • Total number of commuters who use public transit

  • The difference between the citywide median income and the median income of transit users (to measure overall attractiveness and quality of the system. “In many cities where the public transit system is shoddy, only the city’s poorer residents who can’t afford a car are compelled to ride it,” SmartAsset explained.)

Here are the top 25 U.S. cities for best public transportation ranked by SmartAsset:

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