Quantcast

Top 25 American Cities With the Best Public Transit

Business

Think you live in one of the top U.S. cities for public transit? Now you can find out where your city stacks up.

The finance information site SmartAsset analyzed data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2014 American Communities Survey to rank major cities' public transit systems. Researchers used five metrics to compare cities with a population of more than 175,000 people.

Researchers compared:

  • Average commute time

  • The percentage difference between commute times of drivers and transit users

  • Percentage of commuters who use public transit

  • Total number of commuters who use public transit

  • The difference between the citywide median income and the median income of transit users (to measure overall attractiveness and quality of the system. “In many cities where the public transit system is shoddy, only the city’s poorer residents who can’t afford a car are compelled to ride it,” SmartAsset explained.)

Here are the top 25 U.S. cities for best public transportation ranked by SmartAsset:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Koch Brothers Plotting Multimillion Dollar War on Electric Vehicles

This Solar Road Will Provide Power to 5 Million People

Nation’s First Vegan-Certified Farm Is Booming in Philly

Artist Turns Old Skateboards Into Beautiful New Guitars

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Farm waste being prepared for composting. USDA / Lance Cheung

By Tim Lydon

Can the United States make progress on its food-waste problems? Cities like San Francisco — and a growing list of actions by the federal government — show that it's possible.

Read More
Pexels

By C. Michael White

More than two-thirds of Americans take dietary supplements. The vast majority of consumers — 84 percent — are confident the products are safe and effective.

Read More
Sponsored
Pexels

By Brianna Elliott, RD

Coconut oil has become quite trendy in recent years.

Read More
The common giant tree frog from Madagascar is one of many species impacted by recent climate change. John J. Wiens / EurekAlert!

By Jessica Corbett

The human-caused climate crisis could cause the extinction of 30 percent of the world's plant and animal species by 2070, even accounting for species' abilities to disperse and shift their niches to tolerate hotter temperatures, according to a study published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Read More
SolStock / Moment / Getty Images

By Tyler Wells Lynch

For years, Toni Genberg assumed a healthy garden was a healthy habitat. That's how she approached the landscaping around her home in northern Virginia. On trips to the local gardening center, she would privilege aesthetics, buying whatever looked pretty, "which was typically ornamental or invasive plants," she said. Then, in 2014, Genberg attended a talk by Doug Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware. "I learned I was actually starving our wildlife," she said.

Read More