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The Story of Change

Climate

Annie Leonard

Our new movie—The Story of Change—has just been released.

We made The Story of Change to inspire our viewers, community members and others to step out of the consumer mindset and into our full power as citizens to build a better future.

That's because too often, when faced with daunting environmental and social problems (say, disruption of the global climate) many of us instinctively flex our power in the only way we know how—as consumers.

Plastic garbage choking the oceans? Carry our own shopping bag.

Formaldehyde in baby shampoo? Buy the brand with the green seal.

Warming planet? Change our lightbulbs.

Without a doubt, those are all good things to do. But the fact is, better shopping isn't going to change the world.

If we really want to build a better future, we have to move beyond voting with our dollars and come together to demand rules that work.

That's the lesson we learned when we looked back at a series of effective movements for change, from the U.S. civil rights movement to the environmental victories of the 1970s. They didn't just pester people to perfect their daily choices; they said we will work together until the problem is solved.

That's not simple, and it won't be easy. We'll have to aim high and act boldly.

But we're convinced that history is on our side. So let's get to work and make the kind of change we know is possible.

Along with the movie we've launched the Changemaker Quiz and Changemaker Challenge, a platform for Story of Stuff Community members to share their action ideas and commitments. Post yours today!

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