Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

The False Promises and Hidden Costs of Fracking

Energy

Food & Water Watch

The oil and gas industry argues that potential economic benefits of fracking justify the risks and costs to public health and the environment. But the industry has grossly overestimated the number of jobs that fracking would create, and has either ignored or dismissed the public costs of the practice. This has created an illusion of economic benefits that is tainting the public debate.

The Fracking Nightmare

New drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, technologies have made it feasible to extract large quantities of oil and gas from shale and similar underground rock formations. While this development has been a boon for the oil and gas industry, it has been a nightmare for communities exposed to the resulting pollution.

The nightmare includes spills of industrial waste, drinking water contamination, air pollution, explosions and fires, and ruined landscapes. Fracking is also contributing to climate-threatening levels of greenhouse gas emissions.

False Promises

With public concern growing, the oil and gas industry, industry-funded academics and analysts, and ideological think tanks have promoted drilling and fracking as an engine of economic growth and prosperity.

But the job projections being touted are misleading. They come from economic forecasting models, not from actual employment data on economies with shale development. The projections do not account for the jobs destroyed in other parts of the economy, such as jobs lost in agriculture or tourism during and in the aftermath of drilling and fracking.

To read the full report—False Promises and Hidden Costs: The Illusion of Economic Benefits from Fracking—by Food & Water Watch, click here.

—————

Stay up-to-date on the latest fracking news by clicking here.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Animal rights activists try to save dogs at a free market ahead of the Yulin Dog Eating Festival in Yulin city, south China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region on June 21, 2014. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

The Chinese city of Shenzhen announced Thursday that it would ban the eating of dogs and cats in the wake of the coronavirus, which is believed to have stemmed from the wildlife trade, according to Reuters.

Read More Show Less
The Great Barrier Reef, where record-high sea temperatures in February caused its most widespread coral bleaching event. JAYNE JENKINS / CORAL REEF IMAGE BANK

Tropical coral reefs are at a critical tipping point, and we've pushed them there, scientists say. Climate change may now cause previously rare, devastating coral bleaching events to occur in tropical coral reefs around the globe on a 'near-annual' basis, reported The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
The first peer-reviewed research into a promising coronavirus vaccine was published Thursday. Javier Zayas Photography / Moment / Getty Images

The world has reached a grim milestone with the number of confirmed coronavirus cases reported by the Johns Hopkins University tracker passing one million.

Read More Show Less