waste
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

waste

By Natalie Marchant

  • Wood accounts for 10% of yearly waste material in the US.
  • The Baltimore Wood Project salvages wood from buildings to repurpose and resell locally to create a circular economy.
  • The initiative also has social benefits, by creating job opportunities in a post-industrial city that has an 8.5% unemployment rate.

An initiative in the US city of Baltimore wants to salvage and reuse as much wood as possible, while also creating jobs.

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Climate activist Edgar McGregor spent more than a year picking up litter every day at Eaton Canyon in Los Angeles. USMARINE0311 / Flickr / CC by 2.0

"I AM DONE!!! I DID IT!!!"

These were the words that climate activist Edgar McGregor tweeted after 589 consecutive days of picking up trash at a popular Los Angeles hiking spot.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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Recent research suggests that some nuclear waste storage facilities along the U.S. coast could experience flooding from rising seas. Art Wager / Getty Images

Nuclear power is a source of low-carbon electricity, but producing it creates dangerous radioactive waste that needs to be stored safely and permanently.

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The U.S. exports up to 40% of its e-waste, with some going to places like Southeast Asia that have little environmental oversight. EyesWideOpen / Getty Images

By Callie Babbitt and Shahana Althaf

It's hard to imagine navigating modern life without a mobile phone in hand. Computers, tablets and smartphones have transformed how we communicate, work, learn, share news and entertain ourselves. They became even more essential when the COVID-19 pandemic moved classes, meetings and social connections online.

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Fireworks contribute to air pollution and plastic waste. herraez / Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

First developed in China more than a thousand years ago, fireworks have since become an integral part of celebrations all over the world. From New Year's Eve festivities, to U.S. Independence Day and Diwali in India, many events have become almost synonymous with the spark and spectacle of mini explosions lighting up the night sky.

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Ikea is among the companies implementing circular economy initiatives. Visual China Group / Getty Images

By Sean Fleming

What goes around comes around, according to the old saying. And in the case of the circular economy, that's certainly true.

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An aerial view of the Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund site on Sept. 22, 2020 in Rancho Palos Verde, CA. Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A joint report on Monday highlighted the pressure that President-elect Joe Biden is already facing to deliver on his environmental justice campaign promises—particularly when it comes to the 34 Superfund sites nationwide for which there is no reliable cleanup funding—the largest backlog of "unfunded" sites in 15 years.

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U.S. returns create about 15 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions. manonallard / Getty Images

Many people shop online for everything from clothes to appliances. If they do not like the product, they simply return it. But there's an environmental cost to returns.

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According to a new report, the U.S. secondhand clothing market is projected to more than triple in value in the next 10 years. yoshiurara / Getty Images

By Hyejune Park and Cosette Marie Joyner Armstrong

A massive force is reshaping the fashion industry: secondhand clothing. According to a new report, the U.S. secondhand clothing market is projected to more than triple in value in the next 10 years – from US$28 billion in 2019 to US$80 billion in 2029 – in a U.S. market currently worth $379 billion. In 2019, secondhand clothing expanded 21 times faster than conventional apparel retail did.

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What will happen to all these batteries once they wear out? Ronny Hartmann / AFP / Getty Images

By Zheng Chen and Darren H. S. Tan

As concern mounts over the impacts of climate change, many experts are calling for greater use of electricity as a substitute for fossil fuels. Powered by advancements in battery technology, the number of plug-in hybrid and electric vehicles on U.S. roads is increasing. And utilities are generating a growing share of their power from renewable fuels, supported by large-scale battery storage systems.

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Solar photovoltaic panels convert sunlight into energy and help combat the climate crisis. BlackRockSolar / Flickr / CC by 2.0

Solar photovoltaic (PV) panels convert sunlight into energy and continue to play an essential role in the fight to stop the climate crisis. As the pioneering panels of the early 2000s near the end of their 30-year electronic lives, however, they are at risk of becoming the world's next big wave of e-waste.

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Recycled paper at the Northern Adelaide Waste Management Authority's recycling site piles up in Edinburgh, Australia, on April 17, 2019. Brenton Edwards / AFP / Getty Images

By Alex Thornton

The Australian government has announced a A$190 million (US$130 million) investment in the nation's first Recycling Modernization Fund, with the aim of transforming the country's waste and recycling industry. The hope is that as many as 10,000 jobs can be created in what is being called a "once in a generation" opportunity to remodel the way Australia deals with its waste.

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