Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Survey Shows Belief in Global Warming on the Rebound

Climate
Survey Shows Belief in Global Warming on the Rebound

The Brookings Institution

After a period of declining levels of belief in global warming, there appears to be a modest rebound in the percentage of Americans who believe temperatures on the planet are increasing.

This is one of the key findings from the latest National Survey of American Public Opinion on Climate Change (NSAPOCC), authored by Barry Rabe, a nonresident senior fellow in governance studies at The Brookings Institution and professor at the Gerald Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan, and Christopher Borick, an associate professor of political science and director of the Muhlenberg College Institute of Public Opinion.

The fall 2011 survey results indicate that current views on the existence of global warming are almost perfectly situated between the highs of late 2008 and the lows of early 2010. Other highlights include:

  • More Americans than ever are pointing to experiences with warmer temperatures as the main reason they believe global warming is occurring.
  • For Americans who believe that climate change is occurring, factors beyond weather (such as declining polar species) appear to be having the greatest effect on convincing an individual that the planet is warming.
  • A sampling of the open-ended comments provided by survey respondents helps demonstrate the role that weather plays in shaping individual views on global warming. Personal observations also play a significant role in leading individuals to say that global warming is not occurring.
  • Nearly 80 percent of Democrats believe in global warming, while Republicans are almost evenly split with 47 percent seeing evidence of increasing global temperatures.
  • The divide between individuals who believe climate change is occurring and those who think it is not happening appears to be enhanced by differences on a number of key issues related to the presentation of research on global warming by scientists and the media.

The survey’s full results can be downloaded by clicking here. We’ve also developed a number of embeddable charts that highlights the report’s findings, which can also be viewed in the full report. We’ve included a few of them below for your reference.

Slide 1

 

Slide2

 

Slide3

For more information, click here.

On Thursday, Maryland will become the first state in the nation to implement a ban on foam takeout containers. guruXOOX / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Maryland will become the first state in the nation Thursday to implement a ban on foam takeout containers.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A sea turtle and tropical fish swim in Oahu, Hawaii. M.M. Sweet / Moment / Getty Images

By Ajit Niranjan

Leaders from across the world have promised to turn environmental degradation around and put nature on the path to recovery within a decade.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Smoke from the Glass Fire rises from the hills on September 27, 2020 in Calistoga, California. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

Just days after a new report detailed the "unequivocal and pervasive role" climate change plays in the increased frequency and intensity of wildfires, new fires burned 10,000 acres on Sunday as a "dome" of hot, dry air over Northern California created ideal fire conditions over the weekend.

Read More Show Less
Sir David Attenborough speaks at the launch of the UK-hosted COP26 UN Climate Summit at the Science Museum on Feb. 4, 2020 in London, England. Jeremy Selwyn - WPA Pool / Getty Images

Sir David Attenborough wants to share a message about the climate crisis. And it looks like his fellow Earthlings are ready to listen.

Read More Show Less
People walk down a flooded street as they evacuate their homes after the area was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Kevin T. Smiley

When hurricanes and other extreme storms unleash downpours like Tropical Storm Beta has been doing in the South, the floodwater doesn't always stay within the government's flood risk zones.

New research suggests that nearly twice as many properties are at risk from a 100-year flood today than the Federal Emergency Management Agency's flood maps indicate.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch