Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Massive Fire at South Philadelphia Oil Refinery Injures Five

Energy
Explosions and a blaze at the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refining Complex on June 21. VOA News / YouTube screenshot

A fire broke out at a Philadelphia oil refinery Friday morning, starting with an explosion so massive it was felt as far away as South Jersey and Delaware County, Pennsylvania, CNN reported.


"All of a sudden — boom — the ground shook. The flame went up. Parts were falling out of the sky," Daryl Lee, who was on his paper route when the explosion ignited around 4 a.m., told 6 ABC Action News. "Like the sun landed on the ground, that's how bright it was. Then as it fell back down, you saw what looked like metal coming down. Like glitter, sparkles, raining down. That's when I realized this thing blew up."

The fire started in a tank containing butane and propane at the Philadelphia Energy Solutions (PES) refinery in South Philadelphia, which is the 10th largest refinery in the nation and the largest on the East Coast, the company claims. Five workers were treated for minor injuries following the blaze, which was extinguished Saturday afternoon. At one point, more than 120 firefighters battled the flames with more than 50 pieces of equipment, 6 ABC Action News reported.

Smoke from the fire raised concerns about air pollution: the refinery is the No. 1 source of particulate matter in the Philadelphia area on a good day, according to NBC 10. However, the Philadelphia Department of Health measured the air quality and concluded that there were "no findings that would point to any immediate danger in the surrounding community at this time."

The city said it would continue to monitor air quality in a statement Sunday. The cause of the fire will be investigated starting Monday by agencies including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board and the Philadelphia Fire Department's Fire Marshal's Office.

Friday's fire comes after a smaller blaze June 10, and the two fires have prompted renewed protests from community members and environmentalists who have long been concerned about the plant's impact on its neighbors.

The group Philly Thrive, which has been protesting the plant since 2015, held a press conference outside Philadelphia's City Hall Friday with four demands:

  1. That Mayor Jim Kenney and the City Council fund a study on turning the refinery into public land for community-owned energy projects
  2. That the Air Management Services and Environmental Protection Agency take stronger action, including imposing fines that would fund community projects and medical bills
  3. That the two agencies not renew the refinery's Title V air permit in July
  4. That a public meeting is coordinated with all agencies to report to the community on the dangers posed by the refinery and the enforcement actions being taken

Philly Thrive member Sylvia Bennet has lived with her two daughters near the refinery for their entire lives, and her daughters both have cancer.

"We're breathing bad air. All we ask for is that they clean up the air, take this fossil fuel away," Bennett told 6 ABC Action News.

However, the PES refinery, which filed for bankruptcy last year, could shutter without activist pressure. A University of Pennsylvania report said it could close within five years due to financial difficulties, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

Friday's fire only adds to PES' financial woes. An alkylation unit involved in the fire was entirely destroyed, Reuters reported. It could take several years to rebuild. Damage to the unit and the refinery overall could mean one of the refinery's two sections would remain shut for an extended period, and then would operate at reduced rates while the unit is replaced.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Yersinia pestis bacteria causes bubonic plague in animals and humans. Illustration based on light microscope image At 1000x. BSIP / UIG Via Getty Images

A herdsman in the Chinese autonomous region of Inner Mongolia was diagnosed with the bubonic plague Sunday, The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Plant pathologist Carolee Bull works in her home garden in State College, Pennsylvania. Carolee Bull, CC BY-ND

By Matt Kasson, Brian Lovett and Carolee Bull

Home gardening is having a boom year across the U.S. Whether they're growing their own food in response to pandemic shortages or just looking for a diversion, numerous aspiring gardeners have constructed their first raised beds, and seeds are flying off suppliers' shelves. Now that gardens are largely planted, much of the work for the next several months revolves around keeping them healthy.

Read More Show Less
Hotter temperatures have been linked to a rise in energy poverty, with more people struggling to meet their energy bills from their household income. Flickr / CC by 2.0

By Emma Charlton

The effects of climate change may more far-reaching than you think.

Hotter temperatures have been linked to a rise in energy poverty, with more people struggling to meet their energy bills from their household income, according to a new study published on ScienceDirect by researchers from Italy's Ca' Foscari University.

Read More Show Less
Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the "brain-eating amoeba") is a free-living microscopic amoeba (single-celled living organism). Centers for Disease Control

As if the surging cases of coronavirus weren't enough for Floridians to handle, now the state's Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed that a person in the Tampa area tested positive for a rare brain-eating amoeba, according to CBS News. The Florida DOH posted a warning to residents to remind them of the dangers of the rare single-celled amoeba that attacks brain tissue.

Read More Show Less

Scientists are urging the WHO to revisit their coronavirus guidance to focus more on airborne transmission and less on hand sanitizer and hygiene. John Lund / Photodisc / Getty Images

The World Health Organization (WHO) is holding the line on its stance that the respiratory droplets of the coronavirus fall quickly to the floor and are not infectious. Now, a group of 239 scientists is challenging that assertion, arguing that the virus is lingering in the air of indoor environments, infecting people nearby, as The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Along the northern shores of the Gulf of Mexico, oysters live in coastal estuaries where saltwater and freshwater meet and mix. Flickr / CC by 2.0

Along the northern shores of the Gulf of Mexico, oysters live in coastal estuaries where saltwater and freshwater meet and mix.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Japan Self-Defense Forces and police officers join rescue operations at a nursing home following heavy rain in Kuma village, Kumamoto prefecture on July 5, 2020. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP / Getty Images

Scores of people remained stranded in southern Japan on Sunday after heavy rain the day before caused deep flooding and mudslides that left at least 34 people confirmed or presumed dead.

Read More Show Less