Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Obama to Nominate Climate Leader John Kerry to Be Next Secretary of State

Climate
Obama to Nominate Climate Leader John Kerry to Be Next Secretary of State

EcoWatch

President Obama will nominate John F. Kerry, the five-term senator from Massachusetts, today, according to Washington officials, to replace Hillary Rodham Clinton as secretary of State.

“Given the tremendous threat posed by climate change to global human security, and indeed to all of humanity and the planet we inhabit, we expect Senator Kerry to make clear his commitment to making climate change the signature issue of the State Department under his leadership," said Friends of the Earth President Erich Pica.

“Senator Kerry has a remarkable record as a longtime environmental champion and climate leader, and the Sierra Club is encouraged that he has been nominated to take the reins at the State Department," said Executive Director of the Sierra Club Michael Brune.

“As Secretary, Senator Kerry will face numerous issues that are crucial to both the security of our nation and the future of our planet, including critical decisions on the Keystone XL pipeline and the international financing of dirty energy. We are eager to work with him as he brings his commitment to fighting climate disruption to the world stage," said Brune.

“As secretary of state, Sen. Kerry would have to demonstrate the highest degree of visionary and committed leadership to tackling the climate crisis according to what science and equity dictate. He would be required to fight doggedly to elevate the Obama administration’s prioritization of climate change to the highest level, with such a mandate to be carried out internationally by climate negotiators operating in a spirit of cooperation and respect for the global crisis we all face and for which the U.S. bears the greatest historical responsibility," continued Pica.

Visit EcoWatch’s CLIMATE CHANGE page for more related news on this topic.

 

 

54% of parents with school-age children expressed concern that their children could fall behind academically, according to a poll conducted over the summer of 2020. Maria Symchych-Navrotska / Getty Images

By Pamela Davis-Kean

With in-person instruction becoming the exception rather than the norm, 54% of parents with school-age children expressed concern that their children could fall behind academically, according to a poll conducted over the summer of 2020. Initial projections from the Northwest Evaluation Association, which conducts research and creates commonly used standardized tests, suggest that these fears are well-grounded, especially for children from low-income families.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A teenager reads a school English assignment at home after her school shut down because of the COVID-19 pandemic on March 22, 2020 in Brooklyn, New York. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis via Getty Images

The pandemic has affected everyone, but mental health experts warn that youth and teens are suffering disproportionately and that depression and suicide rates are increasing.

Read More Show Less

Trending

In an ad released by Republican Voters Against Trump, former coronavirus task force member Olivia Troye roasted the president for his response. Republican Voters Against Trump / YouTube

Yet another former Trump administration staffer has come out with an endorsement for former Vice President Joe Biden, this time in response to President Donald Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Climate Group

Every September for the past 11 years, non-profit the Climate Group has hosted Climate Week NYC, a chance for business, government, activist and community leaders to come together and discuss solutions to the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district of Germany on Aug. 3, 2020. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Elliot Douglas

The coronavirus pandemic has altered economic priorities for governments around the world. But as wildfires tear up the west coast of the United States and Europe reels after one of its hottest summers on record, tackling climate change remains at the forefront of economic policy.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch