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New Website Shows You How to Waste Less, Enjoy More

Food
New Website Shows You How to Waste Less, Enjoy More

Food waste is a serious problem. In the U.S., we waste 40 percent of the food we produce while 49 million Americans—that's nearly one in six Americans—struggle with food insecurity, according to Sustainable America, a nonprofit dedicated to addressing our food and fuel crisis. That's why they have launched the "I Value Food" Campaign website.

In a world of finite resources, we cannot afford to waste so much food when global food production is dependent on fossil fuels, uses vast amounts of the world's freshwater and contributes significantly to carbon and methane emissions. And it's not only the planet but our wallets that are taking a huge hit: American consumers spend $371 per person per year on food that is wasted. It's as if we are throwing out $165 billion every year, according to a report by the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Since so many go hungry in the U.S. and around the world, many organizations and world leaders, including the pope, have spoken out about creating a food system that is not only more sustainable but more equitable so that everyone has access to quality food. Sustainable America's new website is full of statistics on the alarming state of our food system and offers resources to help you "waste less" and "enjoy more." You can take a quiz to see how much food you really waste, and then find out ways to waste even less by changing your habits at home, the grocery store and when you eat out.

Forty percent of food is wasted in the U.S. while 49 million Americans are food insecure. Photo credit: FAO Washington.

If you've always wanted to compost but are not sure how to get started, they have tips for you. If you've ever wondered what you can do with your rock hard loaf of bread or banana peels or you're looking for creative ways to use leftovers, this site has got you covered. Sustainable America says, "From the farm to the fork, the entire food community is working on ways to reduce food waste in the United States. We invite you to join them."

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