Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Marco Rubio: Humans Don't Cause Climate Change

Climate
Marco Rubio: Humans Don't Cause Climate Change

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-FL, like others in Congress, still doesn't believe in the science of climate change.

He apparently also doesn't buy the idea that a cause leads to an effect—you know, that what you do today has an influence on what happens to you tomorrow. There's no other way to describe what he told ABC during an appearance on Sunday's airing of This Week.

“I don’t agree with the notion that some are putting out there, including scientists, that somehow there are actions we can take today that would actually have an impact on what’s happening in our climate,” Rubio said. “Our climate is always changing.”

It would be one thing if Rubio disagreed with some of the methods that the Obama Administration and the United Nations have suggested to combat climate change, but the senator outright said that humans have no role in all of this. For what it's worth, Rubio also said he's ready to become your president.

“I do not believe that human activity is causing these dramatic changes to our climate the way these scientists are portraying it,” Rubio told host Jon Karl after being asked if we were contributing to the warming of the planet. "I do not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it, except it will destroy our economy."

As the Huffington Post points out, Rubio, then leader of his state's House of Representatives, voted for the Florida Environmental Protection Agency to establish a carbon emissions capping system in 2008. Sine then, he's gone as far as to say that he never supported such a thing, just that his state should look into the possibility.

The National Climate Assessment, released just last week, declared Miami as the city that is most vulnerable to rising sea levels. Rubio was born there, attended graduate school there and still calls it his home.

"The fact is that these events that we're talking about are impacting us, because we built very expensive structures in Florida and other parts of the country near areas that are prone to hurricanes. We've had hurricanes in Florida forever. And the question is, what do we do about the fact that we have built expensive structures, real estate and population centers near those vulnerable areas?" he said. "I have no problem with taking mitigation activity."

——–

YOU ALSO MIGHT LIKE

White House’s Alarming Climate Change Study Calls For ‘Urgent Action’

Watch Bill Nye the Science Guy Debate Congresswoman Who Claims Climate Change is ‘Unproven’

NASA: Earth Could Warm 20 Percent More Than Earlier Estimates

——–

Plastic pollution lines a Singapore beach. Vaidehi Shah/ CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

Our plastic pollution problem has reached new heights and new depths.

Scientists have found bits of plastic on the seafloor, thousands of feet below the ocean's surface. Plastic debris has also washed ashore on remote islands; traveled to the top of pristine mountains; and been found inside the bodies of whales, turtles, seabirds and people, too.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A large loggerhead with other injuries washed ashore during the latest cold-stunning event and was treated at New England Aquarium. New England Aquarium

Hundreds of endangered sea turtles were stranded on beaches after suffering "cold stunning" in the waters off Cape Cod, Mass. Local rescuers and wildlife rehabilitators stabilized the turtles at the New England Aquarium (NEAQ) and National Marine Life Center and began treatment. Many of the sea turtles were transported by land or air to partner facilities around the Eastern Seaboard for longer-term care to make room for more incoming, cold-stunned animals.

Read More Show Less

Trending

On Dec. 21, Jupiter and Saturn will be so closely aligned that they will appear as a "double planet." NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory / YouTube

The night sky has a special treat in store for stargazers this winter solstice.

Read More Show Less
Rough handling can result in birds becoming injured before slaughter. Courtesy of Mercy for Animals

By Dena Jones

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) was sued three times this past summer for shirking its responsibility to protect birds from egregious welfare violations and safeguard workers at slaughterhouses from injuries and the spread of the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
A view of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge during Arctic Bird Fest on June 25, 2019. Lisa Hupp / USFWS

By Julia Conley

Conservation campaigners on Thursday accused President Donald Trump of taking a "wrecking ball" to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as the White House announced plans to move ahead with the sale of drilling leases in the 19 million-acre coastal preserve, despite widespread, bipartisan opposition to oil and gas extraction there.

Read More Show Less