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Bill Maher to Donald Trump: It's Time to Make Earth Great Again

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Bill Maher is sick of billionaires' obsession with Mars, more like "Mars-a-Lago," he said.

In a new animation produced by ATTN:, the popular talk show host of Real Time, discusses the perils of our planet, including how "climate change is killing us."


He talks about Trump's new budget proposal, which slashes funding for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency by nearly a third, from $8.2 billion to $5.65 billion. It's the agency "which protects our water, our air and the future of our planet," as Maher puts it.Meanwhile, Trump signed a bill in March calling for a mission to Mars by 2033. NASA estimates the trip will cost $450 billion. Citing initiatives by Amazon's Jeff Bezos and Tesla's Elon Musk, Maher said these missions are a waste of time. Mars is not habitable nor is it economically feasible.

Maher suggests that instead of exploring Mars, we should explore the facts. He explains how environmental policies have been proven to work and can completely reverse the effects of climate change. But, cutting them will get us nowhere, except to maybe the "airless, lifeless, freezing sh*thole" which we seem so preoccupied with getting to, even though it would take about eight months to get there by spaceship and there's no guarantee humans would survive. After all, the temperature at night on Mars "runs a balmy minus 25 to a quite chilling 76 below."

Maher said we should focus our budget on the planet we know we can live on: "Earth: You are Here. You are Home."

Watch here:

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