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'Koch Brothers' Pay Celebrities to Sing Climate Change Denier Anthem

Climate
'Koch Brothers' Pay Celebrities to Sing Climate Change Denier Anthem

In a satirical video from the comedy website Funny or Die and ClimateTruth.org, two actors portray infamous conservative billionaires, Charles and David Koch, or as they put it, "the guys who own the Republican party." They pay well known celebrities, such as Darren Criss, Emily Osment, January Jones, Estelle and Ed Weeks, to sing a climate denier anthem spoofing the 1985 music video "We Are the World."

"There's a major problem plaguing our society," says David. "Idiots who claim that climate change is real."

"Folks, climate change is pure fiction," Charles chimes in. "So we spent billions of dollars assembling the world's hottest conservative pop stars to sing a song that we wrote," explains David. "We hope it proves to you that climate change is pure hogwash," Charles adds.

You be the judge:

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