Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

'Koch Brothers' Pay Celebrities to Sing Climate Change Denier Anthem

Climate

In a satirical video from the comedy website Funny or Die and ClimateTruth.org, two actors portray infamous conservative billionaires, Charles and David Koch, or as they put it, "the guys who own the Republican party." They pay well known celebrities, such as Darren Criss, Emily Osment, January Jones, Estelle and Ed Weeks, to sing a climate denier anthem spoofing the 1985 music video "We Are the World."

"There's a major problem plaguing our society," says David. "Idiots who claim that climate change is real."

"Folks, climate change is pure fiction," Charles chimes in. "So we spent billions of dollars assembling the world's hottest conservative pop stars to sing a song that we wrote," explains David. "We hope it proves to you that climate change is pure hogwash," Charles adds.

You be the judge:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Hidden Camera Prank Exposes Absurdity of Climate Deniers’ Arguments

Jeff Goldblum, Ed Begley, Jr. Mock Fossil Fuel Industry in Funny or Die Video

Donald Trump Attacked by Eagle Named Uncle Sam, GIF Goes Viral

Bernie Sanders: GOP Candidates Care More About Koch Money Than ‘Preserving the Planet for Our Children’

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Moroccan patients who recovered from the novel coronavirus disease celebrate with medical staff as they leave the hospital in Sale, Morocco, on April 3, 2020. AFP / Getty Images

By Tom Duszynski

The coronavirus is certainly scary, but despite the constant reporting on total cases and a climbing death toll, the reality is that the vast majority of people who come down with COVID-19 survive it. Just as the number of cases grows, so does another number: those who have recovered.

In mid-March, the number of patients in the U.S. who had officially recovered from the virus was close to zero. That number is now in the tens of thousands and is climbing every day. But recovering from COVID-19 is more complicated than simply feeling better. Recovery involves biology, epidemiology and a little bit of bureaucracy too.

Read More Show Less
Reef scene with crinoid and fish in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Reinhard Dirscherl / ullstein bild / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

The future for the world's oceans often looks grim. Fisheries are set to collapse by 2048, according to one study, and 8 million tons of plastic pollute the ocean every year, causing considerable damage to delicate marine ecosystems. Yet a new study in Nature offers an alternative, and more optimistic view on the ocean's future: it asserts that the entire marine environment could be substantially rebuilt by 2050, if humanity is able to step up to the challenge.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
A daughter touches her father's head while saying goodbye as medics prepare to transport him to Stamford Hospital on April 02, 2020 in Stamford, Connecticut. He had multiple COVID-19 symptoms. John Moore / Getty Images

Across the country, the novel coronavirus is severely affecting black people at much higher rates than whites, according to data released by several states, as The New York Times reported.

Read More Show Less
Four rolls of sourdough bread are arranged on a surface. Photo by Laura Chase de Formigny and food styling by Lisa Cherkasky for The Washington Post / Getty Images

By Zulfikar Abbany

Bread has been a source of basic nutrition for centuries, the holy trinity being wheat, maize and rice. It has also been the reason for a lot of innovation in science and technology, from millstones to microbiological investigations into a family of single-cell fungi called Saccharomyces.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A coral reef in Egypt's Red Sea. Tropical ocean ecosystems could see sudden biodiversity losses this decade if emissions are not reduced. Georgette Douwma / Stone / Getty Images

The biodiversity loss caused by the climate crisis will be sudden and swift, and could begin before 2030.

Read More Show Less