Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Josh Fox: 'How To Let Go of the World' to Premiere at Sundance

Climate

The day the oil and gas industry came to my house was the loneliest day of my life. I have never been so afraid. But that fear, the fear of losing my home, has taken me so far beyond that place to discover the deepest love and community I've ever know.

I never thought my fight to protect my home near the Delaware River would take me to the banks of the Amazon. Or across the world to the island nations of Vanuatu and Samoa.

But it has.

My new film How to Let Go of the World (and Love All the Things Climate Can't Change) is an odyssey that goes to 12 countries on six continents to investigate climate change—the greatest threat our world has ever know.

I'm thrilled to announce it will premiere at Sundance Film Festival in January 2016. This film has many important stories of courage and community in the face of climate catastrophe and Sundance will be a huge opportunity for us to share them with the world.

And Sundance is just the beginning.

In March we will hit the road with our grassroots tour, bringing the film directly to 100+ frontlines communities around the world. We want to go back to many of the towns in the Gaslands of America where we toured years ago. We want to go to new communities that have been put on the fossil fuel chopping blocking with expansion of fracked-gas infrastructure. We want to go to costal communities, to the ones that will be going under water first. We want to go to communities that have been fighting environmental injustice for decades. We want to go anywhere that there is a community coming together to face the challenges that lie ahead.

You can find out more about how to the bring the tour to your town on our website.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Leonardo DiCaprio: 'Do Not Wait Another Day' to Move to 100% Renewable Energy

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A woman drinks tea inside her home. martin-dm / Getty Images

Cabin fever is often associated with being cooped up on a rainy weekend or stuck inside during a winter blizzard.

In reality, though, it can actually occur anytime you feel isolated or disconnected from the outside world.

Read More Show Less
Pope Francis delivers his homily on April 9, 2020 behind closed doors at St. Peter's basilica in the Vatican. ALESSANDRO DI MEO / POOL / AFP via Getty Images

Pope Francis spoke about the novel coronavirus, suggesting that the global pandemic might be one of nature's responses to the man-made climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Migrating barn swallows rest on electricity cables in Heraklion, Crete, Greece. Patricia Fenn Gallery / Moment / Getty images

Thousands of swallows and other migratory birds have died in Greece trying to cross from Africa to Europe this spring.

Read More Show Less
A ringed seal swims in a water tank at the Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan on July 26, 2013. Kazuhiro Nogi / AFP / Getty Images

Ringed seals spend most of the year hidden in icy Arctic waters, breathing through holes they create in the thick sea ice.

But when seal pups are born each spring, they don't have a blubber layer, which is their protection from cold.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A volunteer sets up beds in what will be a field hospital in the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine on April 8, 2020 in New York City. The cathedral has partnered with Mount Sinai Morningside Hospital and is expected to have more than 400 beds when opened. Spencer Platt / Getty Images

New York state now has more confirmed coronavirus cases than any single country save the U.S. as a whole.

Read More Show Less