Quantcast

Jon Stewart: Going Vegan Is the Solution to So Many of the World's Problems

Food

Jon Stewart interviewed Gene Baur, president and co-founder of Farm Sanctuary, on The Daily Show last night to discuss his new bookLiving the Farm Sanctuary Life: The Ultimate Guide to Eating Mindfully, Living Longer and Feeling Better Every Day. Baur's organization protects farm animals from the cruelty of factory farming by placing them in farm sanctuaries, where they can live out the rest of their days.

Stewart, who personally owns some pigs, points out, "It's harder to eat meat when you know the animal's name." But Stewart lays out the dilemma many face: "On the one side, eating mindfully and vegan seems to be the solution to nutrition, to health, to global warming. On the other side, corned beef." Stewart says he's open to meat alternatives, but he would miss having an old Jewish guy yelling at him while he eats his corned beef.

Baur says not only can we change these habits, we must. "The Dietary Council just released on the heels of this book, that this vegan lifestyle is sort of the solution to so many of the issues that are going on in the world," Stewart says.

Baur enumerates the many benefits of making the switch: "We could save 70 percent on health care costs if we switched to a whole foods, plant-based diet in this country, we could save so much on resources—water, for example, half of the water used in this country is used to raise animals for food—and animal agriculture contributes more to climate change than the entire transportation industry," says Baur.

Watch the clip here:

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Slowing deforestation, planting more trees, and cutting emissions of non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases like methane could cut another 0.5 degrees C or more off global warming by 2100. South_agency / E+ / Getty Images

By Dana Nuccitelli

Killer hurricanes, devastating wildfires, melting glaciers, and sunny-day flooding in more and more coastal areas around the world have birthed a fatalistic view cleverly dubbed by Mary Annaïse Heglar of the Natural Resources Defense Council as "de-nihilism." One manifestation: An increasing number of people appear to have grown doubtful about the possibility of staving-off climate disaster. However, a new interactive tool from a climate think tank and MIT Sloan shows that humanity could still meet the goals of the Paris agreement and limit global warming.

Read More
A baby burrowing owl perched outside its burrow on Marco Island, Florida. LagunaticPhoto / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Burrowing owls, which make their homes in small holes in the ground, are having a rough time in Florida. That's why Marco Island on the Gulf Coast passed a resolution to pay residents $250 to start an owl burrow in their front yard, as the Marco Eagle reported.

Read More
Sponsored
Amazon and other tech employees participate in the Global Climate Strike on Sept. 20, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. Amazon Employees for Climate Justice continue to protest today. Karen Ducey / Getty Images

Hundreds of Amazon workers publicly criticized the company's climate policies Sunday, showing open defiance of the company following its threats earlier this month to fire workers who speak out on climate change.

Read More
Locusts swarm from ground vegetation as people approach at Lerata village, near Archers Post in Samburu county, approximately 186 miles north of Nairobi, Kenya on Jan. 22. "Ravenous swarms" of desert locusts in Ethiopia, Kenya and Somalia threaten to ravage the entire East Africa subregion, the UN warned on Jan. 20. TONY KARUMBA / AFP / Getty Images

East Africa is facing its worst locust infestation in decades, and the climate crisis is partly to blame.

Read More
The Antarctic Peninsula on Feb. 28, 2019. Daniel Enchev / Flickr

By Dan Morgan

Antarctica is the remotest part of the world, but it is a hub of scientific discovery, international diplomacy and environmental change. It was officially discovered 200 years ago, on Jan. 27, 1820, when members of a Russian expedition sighted land in what is now known as the Fimbul Ice Shelf on the continent's east side.

Read More