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Jon Stewart: Climate Change to Blame for Allergies Getting Worse Each Year

Climate

Last night on The Daily Show, Jon Stewart takes time to discuss pollen and seasonal allergies, poking fun at the media for its seemingly alarmist coverage of pollen in recent years. Major news networks were calling this spring a "pollen tsunami," whereas last year, they chose to call it a "pollen vortex."

Every year for the last 10 years, news outlets have said it's "the worst allergy season on record." Stewart asks, "How can every year be the worst? What is it, the Knicks," mocking the team's abysmal record. Stewart then launches into a rant on bad media coverage, only to be interrupted by Mike Tringale of the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, who explains that the media isn't actually overhyping the issue—allergies really are getting worse every year and climate change is to blame.

Check out the clip to find out why:

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