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Interactive Map Shows You Where to Buy Local

Food

Looking for nearby food producers and organic growers to supply food for your sustainable holiday feast? 

Check out this interactive map from Local Harvest that can help you locate family farms, community supported agriculture (CSA) groups, farmer's markets and grocery co-ops, among other local or organic food sources.

Simply type in your ZIP code and you can get a map and listing of local food producers in that area. You also can filter for different outlets, such as grocery stores or farmer's market, or products, such as honey or cheese.

Local Harvest maintains an up-to-date public nationwide directory of small farms, farmers markets and other local food sources.

This map generated from Local Harvest shows farmers markets across the U.S. Click on the image to go to the Local Harvest interactive map.

Visit EcoWatch’s FOOD page for more related news on this topic.

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