Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Groups Call on Cuomo to Open Up Fracking Health Review to Public

Energy
Groups Call on Cuomo to Open Up Fracking Health Review to Public

Riverkeeper

A coalition of New York State’s leading environmental and good-government groups today called on state officials to publicly release the details of a health review of proposed fracking that is currently underway.

In a letter to state Health Commissioner Dr. Nirav R. Shah and Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joseph Martens, representatives of a dozen prominent organizations urged the state to release the details and forthcoming results of the review, which is currently being evaluated by a scientific panel. The groups also called for public hearings to be held in potentially affected areas and a 60-day public comment period on the health review.

These groups were among those who originally called upon the Cuomo administration over a year ago to conduct a comprehensive and public review of the potential health impacts of fracking. Today’s letter is an effort to ensure that the review of fracking’s health impacts is meaningful, inclusive, independent and comprehensive.

The full letter can be found here, and an excerpt follows:

“We remain deeply concerned that the health review is proceeding under a veil of secrecy and without any opportunity for input by the potentially affected public, state-based health professionals or other key stakeholders. To be valid and meaningful, it is absolutely critical that the health review process provide a genuine opportunity for input by local, county and New York State medical and public health professionals, as well as the community members in potentially affected areas of the state.”

The letter was signed by representatives of the Adirondack Mountain Club, Catskill Mountainkeeper, Citizens Campaign for the Environment, Common Cause NY, Delaware Riverkeeper Network, Earthjustice, Earthworks Oil and Gas Accountability Project, Environment New York, Environmental Advocates of New York, Natural Resources Defense Council, Riverkeeper, Inc., Sierra Club Atlantic Chapter and Waterkeeper Alliance.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

A Brood X cicada in 2004. Pmjacoby / CC BY-SA 3.0

Fifteen states are in for an unusually noisy spring.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A creative depiction of bigfoot in a forest. Nisian Hughes / Stone / Getty Images

Deep in the woods, a hairy, ape-like man is said to be living a quiet and secluded life. While some deny the creature's existence, others spend their lives trying to prove it.

Read More Show Less

Trending

President of the European Investment Bank Werner Hoyer holds a press conference in Brussels, Belgium on Jan. 30, 2020. Dursun Aydemir / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

By Jon Queally

Noted author and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben was among the first to celebrate word that the president of the European Investment Bank on Wednesday openly declared, "To put it mildly, gas is over" — an admission that squares with what climate experts and economists have been saying for years if not decades.

Read More Show Less

A dwarf giraffe is seen in Uganda, Africa. Dr. Michael Brown, GCF

Nine feet tall is gigantic by human standards, but when researcher and conservationist Michael Brown spotted a giraffe in Uganda's Murchison Falls National Park that measured nine feet, four inches, he was shocked.

Read More Show Less
Kelsey Mueller, 16, pets Ruby while waiting with her family to be escorted from the evacuation zone at the Shaver Lake Marina parking lot off of CA-168 during the Creek Fire on Sept. 7, 2020 in Shaver Lake, California. Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

By Daisy Simmons

In a wildfire, hurricane, or other disaster, people with pets should heed the Humane Society's advice: If it isn't safe for you, it isn't safe for your animals either.

Read More Show Less