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Germany Generates Record-Setting 74 Percent of Energy From Renewables

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Germany Generates Record-Setting 74 Percent of Energy From Renewables

Germany remains one of the best examples around the world for countries, regions and communities with dreams of amping up their renewable energy generation.

The country on Sunday set a record by generating 74 percent of energy from renewable sources, according to Renewables International.

The news follows a record-setting first quarter for the country, with renewables meeting 27 percent of demand. Renewable generators produced 40.2 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity during this year's first three months, compared up to 35.7 billion kilowatt-hours in the same period last year, the Federal Association of Energy and Water Industries told Bloomberg.

“Once again, it was demonstrated that a modern electricity system such as the German one can already accept large penetration rates of variable but predictable renewable energy sources such as wind and solar PV power,” Bernard Chabot, a renewable energy consultant in France told Think Progress.

“In fact, there are no technical and economic obstacles to go first to 20 percent of annual electricity demand penetration rate from a combination of those two technologies, then 50 percent and beyond by combining them with other renewables and energy efficiency measures and some progressive storage solutions at a modest level.”

Photo credit: Tim Fuller/Flickr Creative Commons

Germany is still Europe’s largest clean-energy market. It wants to boost renewables to 80 percent or more by 2050.

The country set a record for its wind energy generation on Dec. 6 when it peaked at a little more than 26,000 megawatts. Generation on Christmas Eve almost broke the record again.

Germany is also home to places like Feldheim, a tiny, 150-person village that created an independent energy grid relying on renewable energy.

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