Quantcast

Frightening Interactive Wildfire Map Shows That the West Is on Fire

Climate

Climate Central, a dedicated team of scientists and journalists researching climate change, has put together an interactive map that shows in real time the active wildfires in the U.S. Each flame icon indicates an active wildfire.

Climate Central explains:

Hover over a given fire to see its name, and if you zoom in you’ll be able to see the outline of the area that’s burning—the so-called fire perimeter. If you click within the perimeter, a window pops up showing the fire’s size in acres, the amount by which the perimeter has grown or shrunk over the past 24 hours, the fraction of the fire that has been contained and other data. There’s also a link to an even more detailed report.

A few months ago, experts predicted that this season would be the worst one yet for wildfires and so far it's shaping up to be. Alaska, in particular, has seen an astounding number of fires with a record area burned this year. So far this year, fires have burned nearly 5 million acres, an area the size of Connecticut. Climate Central reports that because of climate change, Alaska is entering a new era for wildfires.

And it's not just Alaska, but the entire West, as evidenced by the map above. Due to high temperatures, record low snowfall and an epic drought, this year is the second-highest for total acreage burned in at least the past 25 years, according to data from the National Interagency Fire Center.

The interactive map is based on data from the Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Group. The information is updated daily from reports by fire managers on the scene, satellite imagery and GPS data, among other sources.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Halfway to Hell: Global Temperatures Hit Critical Point, Warn Scientists

Bill Nye’s ‘Twin Brother’ Reveals the Truth About Climate Change and Fossil Fuels

What the World Needs from the Paris Climate Talks

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Pixnio

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Many types of flour are commonly available on the shelves of your local supermarket.

Read More Show Less
A visitor views a digital representation of the human genome at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. Mario Tama / Getty Images

Genetics are significantly more responsible for driving autism spectrum disorders than maternal factors or environmental factors such as vaccines and chemicals, according to a massive new study involving more than 2 million people from five different countries.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Golde Wallingford submitted this photo of "Pure Joy" to EcoWatch's first photo contest. Golde Wallingford

EcoWatch is pleased to announce our third photo contest!

Read More Show Less
Pixabay

By Emilie Karrick Surrusco

Across the globe, extreme weather is becoming the new normal.

Read More Show Less
A worker in California sprays pesticides on strawberries, one of the crops on which chlorpyrifos is used. Paul Grebliunas / The Image Bank / Getty Images Plus

President Donald Trump's U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will not ban the agricultural use of chlorpyrifos, a toxic pesticide that the EPA's own scientists have linked to brain damage in children, The New York Times reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Conservationists estimate the orange-fronted parakeet population has likely doubled. Department of Conservation

Up until 25 years ago, New Zealand's orange-fronted parakeet, or kākāriki karaka, was believed to be extinct. Now, it's having one of its best breeding seasons in decades, NPR reported Thursday.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

The world's population will hit 10 billion in just 30 years and all of those people need to eat. To feed that many humans with the resources Earth has, we will have to cut down the amount of beef we eat, according to a new report by the World Resources Institute.

Read More Show Less

Beachgoers enjoying a pleasant evening on Georgia's St. Simons Island rushed into the water, despite warnings of sharks, to rescue dozens of short-finned pilot whales that washed ashore on Tuesday evening, according to the New York Times.

Read More Show Less