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Fracking in New York Will Lead to More Wastewater Injection Wells in Ohio

Energy

People's Oil & Gas Collaborative-Ohio

[Editor's note: The following letter to New York's Gov. Andrew Cuomo was written by a coalition of Ohio organizations and residents who understand the impacts fracking in New York will have on Ohio. You can also express your concern to Gov. Cuomo regarding fracking in New York.]

Dear Governor Cuomo:

Kari Matsko, director of the People's Oil & Gas Collaborative-Ohio, delivers Ohio's statement of solidarity to Governor Cuomo's office. Photo by Julie A. Edgar

We, the undersigned Ohioans, are writing to request that you oppose shale gas extraction via fracking in all areas of New York, including the Southern tier. Such development would be irresponsible not only for the reasons outlined below, but also due to the lack of infrastructure for proper disposal of fracking waste products within your state.

Because neighboring New Jersey will not accept out of state fracking waste, Ohio becomes a likely target for the disposal of the fluid by-products of fracking. Ohio relies on class II injection wells for disposal of such fluids. In recent years we’ve experienced increasing numbers and magnitudes of earthquakes as a result of this process. A moratorium was issued by our state due to the severity of the issue. Thus, Ohio's current injection well space is at or over capacity. Should we be expected to receive New York waste, our citizens will be forced to endure many more injection wells in their communities.

We, the undersigned Ohioans join the many other Ohioans opposed to more injection wells in our state.  As recently as this month the city of Cincinnati voted unanimously to ban waste injection wells and the NRDC and others submitted comments detailing that the proposed regulations of Ohio injection wells do not meet minimum standards.

We also endorse the following:

1. Letter from eleven national environmental groups collectively representing millions of members nationwide.

2. Coalition letter with more than 22,000 signatories which requests that Governor Cuomo withdraw the Revised Draft SGEIS until 17 documented concerns have been fully resolved.

3. Coalition letter with more than 2,700 signatories that opposes any fracking "Demonstration Project" in the Southern Tier and requests strict enforcement of Executive Order No. 41

Respectfully Submitted,

Kari Matsko, Director
People’s Oil & Gas Collaborative- Ohio

Teresa Mills
Center for Health, Environment and Justice
           
Cheryl Johncox, Executive Director                     
Buckeye Forest Council

Sandy Buchanan, Executive Director

Ohio Citizen Action

Heather Cantino, Steering Committee Member

Athens County Fracking Action Network
         

Laurie Eliot-Shea/Nathan Johnson
No Frack Ohio Coalition

Greg Pace                                                         
Guernsey County Citizens Support on Drilling Issues                                                            

Bill Baker
Frack Free Ohio

Monica Beasley-Martin                                  
Defenders of the Earth Outreach Mission          

Susie Beiersdorfer                                            
Frackfree Mahoning Valley           

Kathie Jones                                                     
Concerned Citizens of Medina County            

Lori Babbey                                                    
Concerned Citizens of Portage County                

Gwen B. Fischer                                             
Concerned Citizens Ohio                                      

Terry Grange
Marengo, Ohio

Barbara R. Wolf
Cincinnati, Ohio

Robin Webb
Butler, Ohio

Joanne Gerson
Southwest Ohio No Frack Forum

Jack Shaner, Deputy Director                                 
Ohio Environmental Council

John Rumpler, Senior Attorney                 
Environment Ohio

Kathryn Hanratty, Water Advocate                              
Frack-Free Geauga


Fr.. Neil Pezzulo
Glenmary

Home Missioners


Lea Harper                                                    
FreshWater Accountability Project                     

Tish O’Dell, Co-Founder
MADION, Mothers Against Drilling In Our Neighborhoods    

Chris Borello, President
Concerned Citizens of Lake Twp./Uniontown IEL Superfund Site

Diana Ludwig                                                  
Frackfree America National Coalition     

Margaret Fenton


Berryfield Farm
Centerburg, OH

Mary Greer
Concerned Citizens Ohio/Shalersville

Dr. Deborah Fleming,
Professor of English and Chair of the Department
Ashland University

 

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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