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Frack Mob Says No to Spectra Energy's Radioactive Pipeline

Energy

Occupy the Pipeline

On Oct. 6, fractivists painted their bodies green and choreographed a Frack Mob at the entrance to Spectra Energy's radioactive pipeline construction site.

This Public Spectra-cle was a performance art statement about the public health and safety risk that the Spectra Energy Pipeline will bring to New York City if it is allowed to continue its construction on the site at the end of Gansevoort Street and the Hudson River.

We are using public spectacle as part of the direct action campaign to shut down the Spectra Energy pipeline. This pipeline will bring "Natural" Gas from the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania to the shores of our great city after passing underneath New Jersey. The process of fracking is how the gas is extracted from the shale formation. It is highly detrimental to the water table and the entire ecosystem. It also destroys local economy, effecting farming, tourism and recreation. The process of fracking releases hundreds of chemicals into the water system, causing water to become flammable.

The Marcellus Shale contains a higher concentration of radon gas than other frack well sites. This radon, which is a radioactive carcinogen, is released with the natural gas and would be transported to us through the pipeline. There is also danger that the pipeline could explode. If it did explode, it could potentially take out one of three New York City fire boats and a children's playground, not to mention countless homes and businesses, and killing thousands.

We say NO FRACKING WAY.

See more photos from this action by clicking here.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

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