Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Frack Mob Says No to Spectra Energy's Radioactive Pipeline

Energy
Frack Mob Says No to Spectra Energy's Radioactive Pipeline

Occupy the Pipeline

On Oct. 6, fractivists painted their bodies green and choreographed a Frack Mob at the entrance to Spectra Energy's radioactive pipeline construction site.

This Public Spectra-cle was a performance art statement about the public health and safety risk that the Spectra Energy Pipeline will bring to New York City if it is allowed to continue its construction on the site at the end of Gansevoort Street and the Hudson River.

We are using public spectacle as part of the direct action campaign to shut down the Spectra Energy pipeline. This pipeline will bring "Natural" Gas from the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania to the shores of our great city after passing underneath New Jersey. The process of fracking is how the gas is extracted from the shale formation. It is highly detrimental to the water table and the entire ecosystem. It also destroys local economy, effecting farming, tourism and recreation. The process of fracking releases hundreds of chemicals into the water system, causing water to become flammable.

The Marcellus Shale contains a higher concentration of radon gas than other frack well sites. This radon, which is a radioactive carcinogen, is released with the natural gas and would be transported to us through the pipeline. There is also danger that the pipeline could explode. If it did explode, it could potentially take out one of three New York City fire boats and a children's playground, not to mention countless homes and businesses, and killing thousands.

We say NO FRACKING WAY.

See more photos from this action by clicking here.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

 

Google Earth's latest feature allows you to watch the climate change in four dimensions.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Researchers say there's a growing epidemic of tap water distrust and disuse in the U.S. Teresa Short / Moment Open / Getty Images

By Asher Rosinger

Imagine seeing a news report about lead contamination in drinking water in a community that looks like yours. It might make you think twice about whether to drink your tap water or serve it to your kids – especially if you also have experienced tap water problems in the past.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A new report urges immediate climate action to control global warming. John W Banagan / Getty Images

A new report promoting urgent climate action in Australia has stirred debate for claiming that global temperatures will rise past 1.5 degrees Celsius in the next decade.

Read More Show Less
Winegrowers check vines during the burning of anti-frost candles in the Luneau-Papin wine vineyard in Le Landreau, near Nantes, western France, on April 12, 2021. SEBASTIEN SALOM-GOMIS / AFP via Getty Images

French winemakers are facing devastating grape loss from the worst frost in decades, preceded by unusually warm temperatures, highlighting the dangers to the sector posed by climate change.

Read More Show Less
A recent study focused on regions in Ethiopia, Africa's largest coffee-producing nation. Edwin Remsberg / Getty Images

Climate change could make it harder to find a good cup of coffee, new research finds. A changing climate might shrink suitable areas for specialty coffee production without adaptation, making coffee taste blander and impacting the livelihoods of small farms in the Global South.

Read More Show Less