Quantcast

Frack Free Colorado Rally and Concert Promotes a Renewable Energy Future

Energy

Frack Free Colorado

'Fractivists' at Civic Park in Denver for the Frack Free Colorado rally on Oct. 23.

A diverse mix of celebrities, scientists and non-profit leaders joined forces yesterday to host a rally and concert on Capital Hill in Denver to protest fracking, a technique used to release oil and gas from deep below the Earth’s surface. The Frack Free Colorado rally featured speeches and performances by Jakob Dylan of The Wallflowers, actors Daryl Hannah and Mariel Hemingway, the band Elephant Revival and many others.

“In these times of crisis, we must stand up for each other and our life support systems by doing all we can to speak up for true energy independence and energy security with regionally-based, clean renewables,” said actor and activist Darly Hannah.

Sandra Steingraber, an acclaimed ecologist, cancer survivor and author of Living Downstream, spoke of the negative health effects of fracking. "I see the courthouse is lit up in pink. I assume that's for Breast Cancer Awareness. If we want to prevent cancer, we must stop fracking."

Activist and actor Daryl Hannah at the Frack Free Colorado rally on Oct. 23.

Steingraber also spoke about the importance of coalition building and discussed her work with New Yorkers Against Fracking, a coalition of more than 180 local, regional and national groups. She said that advocates have managed to keep the New York’s fracking moratorium in place, despite heavy pressure from the oil and gas industry.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

--------

Frack Free Colorado is sponsored by Patagonia, Prana, Black Diamond, New Belgium Brewing Company, Backpacker’s Pantry, Vibrant Planet, Conscious Global Leadership, The Invisible Spark, Sierra Club, 1% for the Planet, Lighthouse Solar and Backbone Media. The event’s co-organizers include Water Defense, Artists Against Fracking, Food & Water Watch, Clean Water Action, CREDO, etown, Rock the Earth, East Boulder County United, Wilderness Workshop, Erie Rising, The Mothers Project, Adams County Unite Now, Earth Guardians, Boulder County Citizens for Community Rights, Out Health Our Future Our Longmont, Mass Current and What the Frack?! Arapahoe.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Cracker Lake, Glacier National Park, Montana. Jacob W. Frank / NPS / Flickr

By Jason Bittel

High up in the mountains of Montana's Glacier National Park, there are two species of insect that only a fly fishermen or entomologist would probably recognize. Known as stoneflies, these aquatic bugs are similar to dragonflies and mayflies in that they spend part of their lives underwater before emerging onto the land, where they transform into winged adults less than a half inch long. However, unlike those other species, stoneflies do their thing only where cold, clean waters flow.

Read More
Augusta National / Getty Images

By Bob Curley

  • The new chicken sandwiches at McDonald's, Popeyes, and Chick-fil-A all contain the MSG flavor enhancement chemical.
  • Experts say MSG can enhance the so-called umami flavor of a food.
  • The ingredient is found in everything from Chinese food and pizza to prepackaged sandwiches and table sauces.

McDonald's wants to get in on the chicken sandwich war currently being waged between Popeyes and Chick-fil-A.

Read More
Sponsored
Protesters march during a "Friday for future" youth demonstration in a street of Davos on Jan. 24 on the sideline of the World Economic Forum annual meeting. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Youth climate activists marched through the streets of Davos, Switzerland Friday as the World Economic Forum wrapped up in a Fridays for Future demonstration underscoring their demand that the global elite act swiftly to tackle the climate emergency.

Read More
chuchart duangdaw / Moment / Getty Images

By Tim Radford

The year is less than four weeks old, but scientists already know that carbon dioxide emissions will continue to head upwards — as they have every year since measurements began leading to a continuation of the Earth's rising heat.

Read More
Lucy Lambriex / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson

Each year, an estimated 600 million people worldwide experience a foodborne illness.

While there are many causes, a major and preventable one is cross-contamination.

Read More