Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Canadian Fisherman Killed by Whale He Rescued

Popular
www.youtube.com

Dedicated whale rescuer Joe Howlett was struck and killed Monday by a North Atlantic right whale that he helped free. The critically endangered whale was entangled in commercial fishing gear off of New Brunswick, Canada.

Howlett, a 59-year-old Canadian fisherman, was a co-founder of the Campobello Whale Rescue team and was on a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fast response vessel at the time of the tragedy.


"They got the whale totally disentangled, and then some kind of freak thing happened and the whale made a big flip," Mackie Green of the team told The Canadian Press.

The department's minister, Dominic LeBlanc, said that participating in whale rescue operations "requires immense bravery and a passion for the welfare of marine mammals."

LeBlanc also described Howlett as an "irreplaceable member of the whale rescue community."

Howlett had helped rescue about two dozen whales over the last 15 years, according to CBC.

In the video above, Howlett and Green work for several grueling hours to disentangle a 6-year-old right whale caught in a mass of fishing gear.

The International Fund for Animal Welfare, a partner with the Campobello Whale Rescue Team, remembered Howlett as a dedicated volunteer who lived up to the organization's core mission.

"Joe lived and breathed that mission, and thanks to his tireless dedication, he saved dozens of whales over the last 15 years," the organization said. "Joe will be remembered as a kind man with great humor and a ready smile. Our thoughts are with Joe's friends and family who are experiencing this heartbreaking loss."

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A woman walks to her train in Grand Central Terminal as New York City attempts to slow down the spread of coronavirus through social distancing on March 27. John Lamparski / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

A council representing more than 800,000 doctors across the U.S. signed a letter Friday imploring President Donald Trump to reverse his call for businesses to reopen by April 12, warning that the president's flouting of the guidance of public health experts could jeopardize the health of millions of Americans and throw hospitals into even more chaos as they fight the coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less
polaristest / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Melissa Kravitz Hoeffner

Over six gallons of water are required to produce one gallon of wine. "Irrigation, sprays, and frost protection all [used in winemaking] require a lot of water," explained winemaker and sommelier Keith Wallace, who's also a professor and the founder of the Wine School of Philadelphia, the largest independent wine school in the U.S. And water waste is just the start of the climate-ruining inefficiencies commonplace in the wine industry. Sustainably speaking, climate change could be problematic for your favorite glass of wine.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Pixabay

By Rachael Link, MS, RD

Spinach is a true nutritional powerhouse, as it's rich in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Jeff Turrentine

From day to day, our public health infrastructure — the people and systems we've put in place to keep populations, as opposed to individuals, healthy — largely goes unnoticed. That's because when it's working well, its success takes the form of utter normalcy.

Read More Show Less
Spring Break vs. COVID19: The Real Impact of Ignoring Social Distancing

By Eoin Higgins

A viral video showing cell phone data collected by location accuracy company X-Mode from spring break partiers potentially spreading the coronavirus around the U.S. has brought up questions of digital privacy even as it shows convincingly the importance of staying home to defeat the disease.

Read More Show Less