Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

First Vaquita Rescued in Bid to Save the Porpoise From Extinction

Animals
First Vaquita Rescued in Bid to Save the Porpoise From Extinction
Scientists releasing the calf back into the wild. VaquitaCPR

A project to save a small, critically endangered porpoise called the vaquita in the Gulf of California succeeded in capturing a 6-month-old calf in mid-October.

Veterinarians noticed signs of stress, so they made the decision to release it back into the wild, rather than keep it in a sea pen.

The project's leaders are heartened by the experience and hope to round up more vaquita to keep them safe from the still-present threat of gillnet entanglement in the northern Sea of Cortez.

For the first time, a team of scientists has captured and then released a vaquita (Phocoena sinus), a rare porpoise in the Gulf of California, as part of a project called VaquitaCPR aimed at hauling the critically endangered species back from the edge of extinction.


"The successful rescue made conservation history and demonstrates that the goal of VaquitaCPR is feasible," said Rafael Pacchiano, the minister of the environment and natural resources in Mexico, in a statement. "No one has ever captured and cared for a vaquita porpoise, even for a brief period of time."

VaquitaCPR

The VaquitaCPR team, comprising members from at least seven countries, caught a 6-month-old calf on Oct. 19 with the aid of underwater acoustic monitoring, but team veterinarians noticed that the animal seemed to be stressed out. Once they had taken tissue samples for later genetic testing, they released it back into the location where they had found it.

"While we were disappointed we could not keep the vaquita in human care, we have demonstrated that we are able to locate and capture a vaquita," said Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho, a government scientist and the head of VaquitaCPR, in the statement.

Short for "Vaquita Conservation, Protection and Recovery," VaquitaCPR is a Mexican government-led project aiming to find the porpoises in the wild and house them in specially built pens. It's a last-ditch effort to save the remaining vaquita, whose numbers have declined to fewer than 30, one that was recommended by the International Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita, known by its Spanish acronym, CIRVA.

Team members with a vaquita calf. VaquitaCPR

Gillnets, now banned in the Gulf of California, still pose the persistent danger of entanglement to vaquita, whether as abandoned "ghost" nets or those used by fishermen and women hunting for a Critically Endangered fish called the totoaba (Totoaba macdonaldi). Totoaba swim bladders fetch thousands of dollars in Asian traditional medicine markets.

Ultimately, the team plans to shelter caught vaquita in floating sea pens near the town of San Felipe until the animals have a better chance of survival. Crews are also searching for ghost and illicit nets with the help of U.S. Navy-trained dolphins and a boat from the Whale Museum in La Paz. VaquitaCPR said that the boat is responsible for pulling 274,320 meters (900,000 feet) of nets from the water.

Though the scientists weren't able to keep the animal from this first "rescue," Rojas-Bracho said that the process helped validate VaquitaCPR's ability to transport and assess the health of a captured vaquita.

The animal is sometimes referred to as the "panda of the sea" or by its Spanish name, vaquita marina, which translates to "little sea cow."

Pacchiano said this experience made him hopeful. "I am confident we can indeed save the vaquita marina from extinction."

Video of vaquita rescue efforts in the Gulf of California below.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Mongabay.

A "trash tsunami" has washed ashore on the beaches of Honduras, endangering both wildlife and the local economy.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Long-finned pilot whales are seen during a 1998 stranding in Marion Bay in Tasmania, Australia. Auscape / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

More long-finned pilot whales were found stranded today on beaches in Tasmania, Australia. About 500 whales have become stranded, including at least 380 that have died, the AP reported. It is the largest mass stranding in Australia's recorded history.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A protest in solidarity with the Wetʼsuwetʼen's anti-pipeline struggle, at Canada House in Trafalgar Square on March 1, 2020 in London, England. More than 200 environmental groups had their Facebook accounts suspended days before an online solidarity protest. Ollie Millington / Getty Images

Facebook suspended more than 200 accounts belonging to environmental and Indigenous groups Saturday, casting doubt on the company's stated commitments to addressing the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The Västra Hamnen neighborhood in Malmö, Sweden, runs on renewable energy. Tomas Ottosson / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Harry Kretchmer

By 2030, almost a third of all the energy consumed in the European Union must come from renewable sources, according to binding targets agreed in 2018. Sweden is helping lead the way.

Read More Show Less
An Extinction Rebellion protester outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In another win for climate campaigners, leaders of 12 major cities around the world — collectively home to about 36 million people — committed Tuesday to divesting from fossil fuel companies and investing in a green, just recovery from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch